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The Transport Service

By Patrick McSherry


Transports on the move to Cuba
Shortcut to transport list

General:

As the Spanish American War approached, the U.S. Army Quartermaster Department began to plan for the tremendous logistical problems presented by having to carry the U.S. Army, swelling in size, to the enemy. The main emphasis was on the Cuban Campaign. The possibility of sending an army to the Philippines was not initially contemplated.
 

"Anticipating the possible needs of the Quartermaster's Department for ocean transportation fo the movement of troops and supplies to Cuba, early action was taken by this office [Quartmaster Department, Division of Transportation] communicating with the various American steamship companies conducting the ocean traffic on the Atlantic and Gul coasts to ascertain what vessels were available for charter for that purpose..."
The Quartermaster's Department sent representatives to New York and various other locations to find vessels that would be suitable to charter. Using foresight, and acknowledging that the Army's Quartermaster Department was not the expert in purchasing ships, it requested that, whenever possible, respresentatives of the Navy accompany them to give their opinion on the suitability of the various ships.

Initially, from the declaration of war until June 30, the Quartermaster Department chartered 43 vessels for use on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts (total displacement of 104,201 tons, with a carrying capacity of 1,287 officers, 22,335 enlisted men and 6.746 horses and mules).

A close-up veiw of the stern. It clearing deotes that this is an Army vessel, not a privately owned
vessel, or a Navy-operated vessel. It reads "CHESTER U.S.A. Q.M. DEPT." meaning "CHESTER,  U.S. Army Quartermaster Department"

During the same period, the Quartermaster Department went to work trying to obtain transports for use on the Pacific coast. The move was somewhat belated, once the surprisingly complete naval victory at Manila Bay dictated the need for a land force. On the Pacific coast, obtaining transports was a more difficult task. First, though the steamship companies did agree to co-operate, most of the vessels were at sea in the vast Pacific, and waiting for them to arrive to be reviewed and contracted took time. Secondly, the Pacific transports would have to be larger and more substantial to carry the large number of men the 7,000 miles to the Philippines. This was not a short cruise as was the cruise to Cuba or Puerto Rico. From the declaration of war until June 30, the Quartermaster Department chartered 14 vessels for use on the Pacific coast (total displacement 41,152 tons, with a capacity of 629 officers and 13,059 enlisted men).

After obtaining the vessels, the Department had to modify the vessels to allow them to carry the troops. Sleeping accommodations had to be installed,  stalls added for the animals, etc. Water tanks and electrical systems were upgraded, and fans added for ventilation. Galleys were upgraded to handle the large numbers of men, as were the sanitary facilities. Particular efforts were made to make the Pacific coast transports acceptable for their lengthy sojourn on the ocean since it was clearly understood that troops who arrived ill, could not be expected to fight. Later Pacific coast vessels were even equipped with refrigeration capabilities to enable fresh meat to be served aboard the vessel, and improved steaming capabilities (less roll).

Crowded conditions with a transport. These men appear to be foreign military observers

In spite of the efforts of the Quartermaster Department, the transports were less than excellent. The crowding, the heat, insufficient sanitary facilities, and the resulting stench made the transports anything but pleasant.

Soon, however, it became apparent that still greater transport capacities would be needed as the estimates of the number of troops needed overseas continued to grow. On the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, four more vessels were located - the WANDERER, LA GRANDE DUCHESSE, TARPON and UTE - increasing the troop capacity to over 25,000 men. On the Pacific coast four more vessels were also located - the CITY OF RIO DE JANEIRO, PENNSYLVANIA, ST. PAUL, and TACOMA. The TACOMA was significant, and indicative of the difficult charter situation. She was was the only sailing vessel chartered by the Quartermaster Department. The remainder were all steamships.

As the demand for transports was still not met, an issue compounded by the U.S. Government's decision not to charter vessels of foreign registry, the Quartermaster Department was forced to take more drastic and long-term step. It had to purchase vessels outright.

Fourteen vessels were purchased by the Department for use on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts with two more purchased for use on the Pacific coast. The total cost of the vessels (not including refitting) was $6,231,000, a hefty amount for the period. These vessels had a capacity of 720 officers, 12,700 enlisted men, and 6,750 horses, mules, etc. Two of the purchased vessels were the RITA and the PANAMA, both of which had been captured by the U.S. Navy during the war, and sold as prizes.

The transport force was supplemented by some of the auxiliary cruisers of the Navy. These were oceanliners which were fitted with guns for use in the blockade. Many of these vessels spent a large amount of their time in transport duty. These included the HARVARD, YALE, ST. LOUIS and ST. PAUL and PANTHER.

The transport service was put to its heaviest test in the Cuban campaign. Luckily the trip to Cuba, once the vessels were finally able to leave port and Cervera's Spanish Squadron was blockaded in Santiago harbor, was uneventful. It was, however, very uncomfortable as the vessels sat in the hot sun with inadequate sewage control and a build up of animal wastes. The uneventfulness was surprising, since the transport fleet was disorganized, spread out and inadequately screened. An attack by a torpedo vessel could have been devastating.

Problems became apparent once the time arrived to land the troops. The vessels were not supplied with an adequate number of lighters or cutters for taking the troops to shore from the vessels. The Navy was forced to supply all the lighters it could and crewmen to man them, but the number was less than needed. This problem would continue to plague Shafter's supply lines throughout the Vth Corps' time in Cuba. In addition, no adequate facility was supplied for unloading the horses. The use of cranes with slings was found to be slow and dangerous to the horses, prompting Rough Rider Lt. Col. Theodore Roosevelt to snort "like a bull," and yell "stop that goddamned animal torture!" The horses were eventually simply herded overboard to fend for themselves. Some made it ashore, some did not (Roosevelt lost one of his two horses in this manner).

The lack of lighters is significant for another reason. Had the vessels been torpedoed, there were no boats provided for use by the troops to save themselves. The loss in life would have been tremendous.

In the final analysis, the transport costs totalled $7,804,016.67. A total of 92,836 men were transported from one point to another (this does not men 92,836 different men!). The number also includes the transport of Spanish prisoners.

The following is a list of some of the transports, and the troops they were known to have carried. Note that the transport numbers are based on the designations listed in Secretary of War Alger's account. This is the only comprehensive list. However, various accounts give conflicting accounts of transport numerical designations.

If you have information on a specific tranport (either listed or not yet listed) or on the troops they carried, let us know!


ALAMO

Click here for an account of life aboard the ALAMO
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 6
2,934
 40
 400
 400
This vessel was chartered from the New York and Texas Steamship Company at a rate of $625 per day. The charter began on April 29 and lasted until September 23, 1898. After thirty days, the rate dropped to $550 per day. She was launched in 1883, and had a speed of 12-13 knots.

This vessel transported:

        Battery C, Pennsylvania Light Artillery from Puerto Rico to the U.S.
        2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry (3 companies) from Puerto Rico to the U.S. (New York City)

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following, consisting of 33 officers and 74 enlisted men:

        10th U.S. Infantry (Headquarters, Band, Companies C, D, E and G) from Tampa to Cuba
        Engineers Battalion (Companies C and E) from Tampa to Cuba
        2nd U.S. Infantry Brigade, 1st Division Headquarters staff
        10th U.S. Cavalry (2 Troops)
 

ALLEGHENY
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 17
2,014
 
 
 
This vessel was launched in 1881, and had a speed of 12-13 knots.

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried:

          Headquarters of the Cavalry Division (General Joe Wheeler) and enlisted men caring for the horses on board consisting of 14 officers
              and 80 enlisted men
          Signal Corps members (1)
          Hospital Corps members (5)
          Midshipman Royal of the U.S. Navy
          Volunteer aid Mr. Mestre
          Clerk (Mr. Wilson)
          Correspondent Cramer of the Atlanta Constitution (Mr. Cramer)
          Correspondent Leighton of the New York Journal (Mr. Leighton)
          Horses (58)
 

ARANSAS
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 27
1,157
 
 
 
This vessel had a speed of 11 knots.

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the transportation equipment for the 3rd U.S. Infantry including 2 officers and 13 enlisted men.

Colonel Astor home from Cuba
 

ARIZONA

Click here for info. on the ARIZONA's trip across the Pacific
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
Liner
5,305
 
 
 
This vessel was originally built for the Guion line in 1879 by the shipbuilder John Elder & Co. of Glasgow. The vessel had a length of 450 feet, and a beam of 40 feet. She was capable of 15 knots. On her second voyage across the Atlantic, she captured the "Blue Riband" and was fastest ship afloat. In her fifth trip, that same year, she rammed an iceberg at full speed, but the interior bulkheads held and she was able to make St. Johns, Newfoundland for repairs.  In 1898, she was refitted and given new triple expansion steam engines to replace her old compound engines to prepare her for the San Francisco to China route. However, she was purchased from the Northern Pacific Railway Company on July 16, 1898 for $600,000. The Navy acquired her in 1903 and renamed her the USS HANCOCK. She served until 1926 as a troops and supply ship.

This vessel transported the following from Honolulu, Hawai'i to Manila, Philippines as part of the Fifth Philippine Expedition:

        1st Colorado Volunteer Infantry (1st, 2nd battalions, Company C)
        1st Nebraska Volunteer Infantry (part)
        10th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (part)
        18th U.S. Infantry, Companies I, K, L, M
 

AUSTRALIA

Click here for a photo of the AUSTRALIA
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
2,755
 50
1,000
 
This vessel was built in 1875, and had a speed of 14-15 knots. She was chartered from the Oceanic Steamship Company from May 10 to August 29, 1898 at the rate of $20,000 per month. The transport must have continued in service after that date as it arrived in San Francisco on December 6, 1898 with portions of the 1st New York Volunteer Infantry.

This vessel transported the following:

1st New York Volunteer Infantry (Companies A, B, D I, and L) from Honolulu to San Francisco, California
2nd Oregon Volunteer Infantry (part)from San Francisco to the Philippines as part of the First Philippine Expedition.


BADGER
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 
 
 
 

This vessel transported the following:

34th Michigan Volunteer Infantry from Santiago, Cuba to Camp Wikoff, Long Island, New York.
BAY STATE
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
777
 
 
 
This vessel was a steamer which was outfitted as a hospital ship, the costs of which was paid for through public subscription from the Massachusetts Relief Association. The effort was made to prepare the vessel to bring troops back from Cuba, but the ship's outfitting was apparently not completed in time, with the vessel beginning operation on November 15, 1898. The cost of the refit was $175,000. The U.S. Army purchased the vessel for $100,000 from the Massachusetts Relief Association. The ship was used to transport Massachusetts troops back to the U.S. from Puerto Rico. The ship was rechristened AID, and then rechristended WRIGHT and used as a transport.
 

BERKSHIRE

Click here to read an account of life aboard Berkshire
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 9
 
2,014
 25
250
 200
This vessel was chartered from the Merchants and Miners' Transport Company from April 29 to September 12, 1898 at a rate of $600 per day.

This vessel transported the following:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 14 officers and 268 enlisted men:
   2nd U.S. Artillery, Battery A to Cuba
   2nd U.S. Artillery, Battery F (officers, men and horses only) to Cuba
 

BERLIN
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 31
 
 5,641
 
 
 
This vessel was purchased by the Army for $400,000 from the International Navigation Co. on July 13, 1898.

This vessel transported the following:

9th U.S. Volunteer Infantry from the U.S. to Cuba
1st Illinois Volunteer Infantry from Santiago, Cuba to Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, Long Island, New York

1st U.S. Infantry from Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, Long Island, New York to New York City
2nd U.S. Infantry from Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, Long Island, New York to New York City

1st Kentucky Volunteer Infantry from Puerto Rico to Newport News, Virginia.
 

BREAKWATER

Click here for a view of the BREAKWATER seemingly aground at Siboney
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 29
 
 1,065
 25
 500
 
This vessel was chartered from the New Orleans Belize Royal Mail Steamship Company from May 12 to September 10, 1898 at a rate of $340 per day.

This vessel transported the following:

3rd U.S. Infantry from the U.S. to Cuba

12th U.S. Infantry (part) from Santiago, Cuba to Camp Wikoff, Montauk, Long Island, New York
 

CATANIA
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
3,700
40
800
 
This vessel was chartered from the Tweedie Trading Co. for $600 per day from June 13 to September 13, 1898.
 

CHEROKEE

 (To read a report describing conditions on the CHEROKEE, click here)
 (To read a letter describing conditions on the CHEROKEE, click here)
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
4
 
2,557
40
900
 
This vessel was chartered from the Wm. P. Clyde & Co. Line for $500 per day. She had a speed of 11 knots.

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 35 officers and 852 enlisted men:
    7th U.S. Infantry (part) to Cuba
    12th U.S. Infantry to Cuba
    17th U.S. Infantry (3 companies and headquarters)
    Vth Corps (Parker's) Gatling Gun Detachment

Also transported the following:
    U.S. Marine Battalion (part) from Isle of Pines to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
    19th U.S. Infantry to Puerto Rico
 

CHESTER

Click here for images of the CHESTER
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
Troop Ship
4,770
 
 
 
This vessel was purchased from the International Navigation Co. on July 27, 1898 at a cost of $200,000.

This vessel transported:
    4th Ohio Volunteer Infantry to Puerto Rico
    4th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry from Puerto Rico to the U. S.
    General Thomas Schwan and staff from Ponce, Puerto Rico to the U.S.

6th U.S. Volunteer Infantry from Puerto Rico to Savannah, Georgia
Sixth U.S. Infantry from Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, Long Island, New York to New York City
Tenth U.S. Infantry from Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, Long Island, New York to New York City
Battery A, First U.S. Artillery from Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, Long Island, New York to New York City
Battery B, First U.S. Artillery from Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, Long Island, New York to New York City
 

CHINA

Click here for an image of the CHINA
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
5,000
75
1500
 
This vessel was chartered from the Pacific Mail Steamship Co. for $1,500 per day. She had a speed of 11 knots.

This vessel was used to tranport the following during the 2nd Philippine Expedition (San Francisco to the Philippines):

Companies A and G,  18th U.S. Infantry
1st Colorado Volunteer Infantry
Utah Volunteer Light Artillery, Battery B, Sections 3, 4, 5.
U.S. Volunteer Engineers, Co. A


CITY OF PARA

Click here for an image and description of life aboard the CITY OF PARA
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
3,532
50 
1,000
 
This vessel had a speed of 12 knots. She was chartered from the Pacific Mail Steamship Company on June 11, 1898, at a rate of $1,000 per day.

This vessel tranported:
        13th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry from San Francisco to the Philippines as part of the 3rd Philippine Expedition.
 

CITY OF PEKIN (or PEKING)

Click here for an image of the CITY OF PEKING
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
5,080
 
 
 
This vessel was launched in 1874, and had a speed of 14-15 knots.

This vessel tranported:

        1st California Volunteer Infantry from San Francisco to Hawaii, Guam and the Philippines as part of the First Philippine Expedition.
 

CITY OF PUEBLA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
2,623
29 
606
 
This vessel had a speed of 12 knots. She was chartered from the Pacific Coast Steamship Company on June 23, 1898, at a rate of $900 per day.

This vessel tranported the following units as part of the 4th Philippine Expedition:

        1st California Volunteer Infantry (part)
        1st Wyoming Volunteer Infantry (part)
        4th U.S. Cavalry (part)
        14th U.S. Infanrty, Companies I, K, L & M
        23rd U.S. Infantry (part)

This vessel tranported the following units as part of the 5th Philippine Expedition:

        1st Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, Companies D, G, H, I, and K
        2nd Oregon Volunteer Infantry
        6th U.S. Artillery, Battery D
        13th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry (part)
        18th U.S. Infantry
        23rd U.S. Infantry
        California Volunteer Heavy Artillery
        Nevada Cavalry, Troop A
 

CITY OF SIDNEY

Click here for an accunt of life aboard the CITY OF SIDNEY
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
3,017
 50
 1,000
 
This vessel was launched in 1875, and had a speed of 12-13 knots.She was chartered from the Pacific Mail Steamship Company at a rate of $1,000 per day, beginning on May 10, 1898, an ending on August 30, 1898.

This vessel tranported the followng from San Francisco to Manila, via Hawaii and Guam as part of the First Philippine Expedition:

        2nd Oregon, Companies F, I, and M
        14th U.S. Infantry, Companies A C, D, E, and F
        California Volunteer Heavy Artillery, Batteries A and D
 

CITY OF WASHINGTON
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 16
 
2,648
30
740
250
This vessel was chartered from the New York an Cuba Mail Steamship Company for $450 per day. She had been built in 1877 and was converted to an auxiliary cruiser during the war. She had a speed of 15 knots.

This vessel was famous for being close by to the USS MAINE when she exploded in Havana Harbor. Boats were launched from the CITY OF WASHINGTON to help rescue survivors.

Click here to visit a site about the divable wreck of this ship.

This vessel tranported:

   4th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry to Puerto Rico (part of the regiment)
   2nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry - New York to Tampa (?)

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 33 officers and 751 enlisted men:
    24th U.S. Infantry to Cuba
    21st U.S. Infantry, 1st Battalion to Cuba
 

CLINTON
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
1,187
 20
 200
 200
She was chartered from the Southern Pacific Company at a rate of $400 per day, beginning on June 8, 1898, an ending on September 11, 1898.

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following:
    2nd U.S. Infantry, Companies B and D
 

COLON
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
2,686
58
950
 
This vessel was chartered from the Pacific Mail Steamship Company from May 27 to September 7, 1898 for $750 per day. She had a speed of 12.5 knots.

This vessel tranported as part of the Second Philippine Expedition from San Francisco to Manila, Philippines:
        Companies B, E of the 18th U.S. Infantry
        23rd U.S. Infantry, Companies D, E, F and H
        Utah Volunteer Artillery, Battery A
 

COMAL
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
7
 
2,934
40
400
 400
This vessel was chartered from the New York and Texas Steamship Company for $625 per day. After thirty days of use, the rate would reduce to $575 per day.

This vessel transported:

5th Artillery to Cuba
 

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 10 officers and 284 enlisted men:
    7th U.S. Infantry, Company I, to Cuba
    1st U.S. Artillery, Light Battery E
    1st U.S. Artillery, Light Battery K
    Baggage and rations for the 10th U.S. Cavalry
 

COMANCHE
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
   
 3,202
 50
 500
 50
This vessel was chartered from the William P. Clyde & Company  for $640 per day between June 3 and September 2, 1898

This vessel transported:

5th U.S. Artillery, Battery D from Puerto Rico to the U.S.
 

CONCHO

 (To read a report describing conditions on the CONCHO, click here)
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
14 
 
3,704
35
700
 10
This vessel was chartered from the New York and Texas Steamship Company for $550 per day, beginning on May 10, 1898 and lasting until September 23, 1898.

This vessel transported:

        Battery B, Pennsylvania Light Artillery from Puerto Rico to New York, U.S.

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 53 officers and 1,034 enlisted men:
        2nd Infantry brigade, 2nd Division, Headquarters to Cuba
        2nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, Third Battalion
        4th U.S. Infantry to Cuba
        25th U.S. Infantry to Cuba
 
 

D. H. MILLER
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 2,296
 25
450 
 300
This vessel was chartered from the Merchants' and Miners' Transportation Company for $600 per day for the first 30 days, and then $550 per day afterwards. She was chartered from April 29 to September 3, 1898.

This vessel transported:

        7th U.S. Infantry, Companies E, G and H from the U.S. to Cuba
 
 

FLORIDA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 1,786
 25
500 
 175
This vessel was chartered from the Plant Investment Company for $600 per day from May 2 to September 9, 1898.
 
 

GATE CITY
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 5
 
 1,997
 25
600 
 
This vessel was chartered from the Ocean Steamship Company for $500 per day from June 6 to August 18, 1898.

This vessel transported:

        3rd U.S. Cavalry from Cuba to Montauk Point, Long Island, NY (Camp Wikoff)
        6th U.S. Cavalry from Cuba to Montauk Point, Long Island, NY (Camp Wikoff)
 
 

GRANDE DUCHESSE (a.k.a LA GRAND DUCHESSE)
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 5,018
 
 
 
This vessel was chartered from the Plant Investment Company for $1,200 per day.

This vessel transported:

71st New York Volunteers (part) from Cuba to Montauk Point, Long Island, NY (Camp Wikoff)
2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry from Charleston to Puerto Rico.
3rd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry from Charleston to Ponce, Puerto Rico


GUSSIE
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 998
 
 
 
This vessel was chartered from the Southern Pacific Company from April 30 to September 11, 1898 for $350 per day. The GUSSIE was well-known as a "filibuster" ship, or one that was used to ship arms and those involved in the rebellion illegally to Cuba prior to the war.
 
 

HARVARD (note: HARVARD was a U.S. Navy vessel and not an Army Transport. It is merely included for completeness).

Click here for a history of the HARVARD and info. on the "Harvard Incident"
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 Auxiliary Cruiser
10,499
 
 
 
The vessel, the CITY OF NEW YORK before being renamed by the Navy, was chartered from the Inman Line.

This vessel transported:
        34th Michigan Volunteer Infantry, (except Companies F, I, K and L)  from Fort Monroe, VA to Siboney, Cuba
        Spanish prisoners of war from Cuba to the U.S.
        33rd Michigan Volunteer Infantry (except Companies E and G) from Santiago, Cuba to Montauk Point, New York
 

HAVANA

Click here for images of the HAVANA
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 
 
 
 
This vessel was a Ward Line steamer. No additional information is currently available.

This vessel transported:
        6th Missouri Volunteer Infantry from Havana, Cuba to Savannah, Georgia
        49th Iowa Volunteer Infantry from Havana, Cuba to Savannah, Georgia
 

HUDSON
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 
 
 
 

This vessel transported:
    1st Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, Companies F, H, I, K, L and M, from Newport News, Virginia to Mayaguez, Puerto Rico
 

INDIANA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
3,158
 50
950 
 
The vessel was chartered from the Empire Transportation Company beginning on June 8, 1898 at a rate of $25,000 per month.

This vessel transported the following units from San Francisco to the Philippines :
        Companies D & H of the 18th U.S. Infantry
        23rd U.S. Infantry, Co. B, C, G, and L
        (Volunteer?) Engineers Battalion, Company A
        North Dakota Volunteer Infantry, Co H.

        20th Kansas Volunteer Infantry, Companies C, D, E, F, G, H, I, K, M (5th Philippine Expedition)
 

IROQUOIS

Click here for an image of the 2nd U.S. Infantry embarking on the IROQUOIS
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
25
 
2,944
 40
700 
 
The vessel was chartered from Wm. P. Clyde & Co. from May 11, 1898 to August 18, 1898 at a rate of $600 per day. During the war, the commanding officer had the last name of Kemple. The vessel had a draft of 15 feet, stored 27,000 gallons of water and had a coal bunker capacity of 1,000 tons. She could steam for 25 days at nine knots until her coal was all used. She carried 8 boats with a capacity of 160 men.

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 38 officers and 722 enlisted men:
       2nd Infantry Division Headquarters to Cuba
       3rd Infantry Brigade, 2nd Division Headquarters to Cuba
       7th U.S. Infantry (Companies A, B, C, D, F and the Headquarters) to Cuba
       17th U.S. Infantry (Companies C, G, H, and K) to Cuba
 

LAMPASAS
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
2,237
 35
200 
 400
The vessel was chartered from the New York and Texas Steamship Company beginning on June 13, 1898 and ending on August 13, 1898 at a rate of $650 per day.

This vessel transported:

        Company H, First District of Columbia Volunteers (Engineers) (Tampa to Key West (to Cuba?))
        Company A, First Illinois Volunteers (Engineers)(Tampa to Key West (to Cuba?))
        Pontoon Train (Tampa to Key West (to Cuba?))
 

LEONA

 (To read a report describing conditions on the LEONA, click here)
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 21
 
3,329
 45
700 
 10
The vessel, built in 1889, was chartered from the New York and Texas Steamship Company beginning on May 10, 1898 and ending on August 29, 1898 at a rate of $500 per day. She was capable of 13 knots.

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 51 officers and 910 enlisted men:
        Brig. Gen. Young and Staff (headquarters 2nd Cavalry Brigade, Cavalry Division) to Cuba
        First U.S. Cavalry (8 troops) to Cuba
        Tenth U.S. Cavalry (8 Troops) to Cuba

        Vth Corps (Parker's) Gatling Gun Detachment from Santiago, Cuba, to Camp Wikoff, Long Island, New York.
 

MANITOBA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 Combination
5,673
 80
 1,000
1,000
The vessel was purchased from Bernard N. Baker on July 20, 1898 at a price of $660,000.

This vessel transported:
        The "Governor's Troop" of Pennsylvania Cavalry to Puerto Rico
        Battery A, Pennsylvania Light Artillery ("Keystone Battery") to Puerto Rico
       Battery C, Pennsylvania Light Artillery to Ponce, Puerto Rico
        "Sheridan Troop," Pennsylvania Cavalry to Puerto Rico
        "Governor's Troop," Pennsylvania Cavalry to Puerto Rico
        6th Illinois Volunteer Infantry from Ponce, Puerto Rico to Weehawken, New Jersey

        4th Tennessee Volunteer Infantry from Savannah, Georgia to Trinidad Cuba and Sancto Spiritus, Cuba
 

MANTEO
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
583
 10
 250
100
The vessel was chartered from May 28 to October 7, 1898 at the rate of $200 per day from the New York and Cuba Mail Steamship Company.
 

MARTERRA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 
 
 
 
This vessel was captured by the North Atlantic Squadron during the war and converted to a transport.

      21st U.S. Infantry (part) from Santiago, Cuba to Camp Wikoff, Montauk, Long Island, New York
 
 

MASSACHUSETTS
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 Combination
5,673
80
1000
1000
This vessel was purchased for use as a transport  from Bernrad N. Baker on July 14, 1898 for $660,000.

This vessel transported:

        First Troop, Philadelphia City Cavalry from the Newport News to Ponce, Puerto Rico.
 

MATTEAWAN

Click here for an image of the MATTEAWAN
Click here for an account and photo of the YUCATAN nearly ramming the MATTEAWAN
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 26
 
3,300
35
720
368
The vessel was chartered from the Miami Steamship Company for $600 per day.

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 32 officers and 734 enlisted men:
        Bates' Independent Brigade Headquarters to Cuba
        20th U.S. Infantry to Cuba
        2nd U.S. Cavalry (Troops F and D) to Cuba
 

MIAMI

Click here for an image of the MIAMI
Click here to read a report describing conditions on the MIAMI
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 1
3,050
45
900
 
This vessel was chartered from the Miami Steamship Company for $550 per day.

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 55 officers and 919 enlisted men:
        6th U.S. Infantry to Cuba
        9th U.S. Cavalry (8 Troops) to Cuba
        Signal Corps members (Cavalry Division, 1st Brigade)

1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry ("Rough Riders") home from Cuba
 

MICHIGAN
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 1
 
3,722
40
800
 800
This vessel was purchased  from Bernard N. Baker on July 14, 1898 for $350,000.

This vessel transported:
        3rd Nebraska Volunteer Infantry from the U.S. to Cuba (December 31, 1898- January 2, 1899).

       4th U.S. Artillery, Battery B from Ponce, Puerto Rico to Savannah, Georgia.
       5th U.S. Artillery, Battery D from Ponce, Puerto Rico to Savannah, Georgia.
       8th U.S. Artillery, Batteries C and F from Ponce, Puerto Rico to Savannah, Georgia.
       2nd U.S. Cavalry, Troop B from Ponce, Puerto Rico to Savannah, Georgia.
       6th U.S. Cavalry, Troop F from Ponce, Puerto Rico to Savannah, Georgia.
       8th U.S. Infantry, Company F from Ponce, Puerto Rico to Savannah, Georgia.
 

MINNEWASKA

Click here for an image of the MINNEWASKA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
Combination
5, 796
100
1,200
 1000
This vessel was purchased  from Bernard N. Baker on July 26, 1898 for $660,000. Apparently it was formerly named the PERSIA.

This vessel transported:
        33rd Michigan Volunteer Infantry, Companies E and G from Santiago, Cuba to Montauk Point, Camp Wikoff, New York
        1st District of Columbia Volunteer Infantry from Santiago, Cuba to Montauk Point, New York
        6th Ohio Volunteer Infantry from Charleston, South Carolina to Cienfuegos, Cuba
        49th Iowa Volunteer Infantry from Savannah, Georgia to Havana, Cuba
 
 

MISSISSIPPI
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 Combination
3,732
40
800
 800
This vessel was purchased for use as a transport  from Bernrad N. Baker on July 14, 1898 for $350,000.

This vessel transported:
        Troop A and C of the New York Cavalry From Purto Rico to Jersey City, NJ
        "First Troop, Philadelphia City Cavalry" from Ponce, Puerto Rico to Jersey City, NJ and Philadelphia, PA
        "Governor's Troop" Pennsylvania Cavalry from Puerto Rico to Jersey City, NJ
        "Sheridan Troop" Pennsylvania Cavalry from Puerto Rico to Jersey City, NJ
        Battery A, PA Artillery from Puerto Rico to Jersey City, NJ
        6th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry from San Juan, Puerto Rico to Boson, Massachusetts
        6th U.S. Volunteer Infantry from New York to San Juan, Puerto Rico
 

MOBILE

Click here for an image of the MOBILE
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 Combination
5,780
80
1000
1000
This vessel was purchased for use as a transport  from Bernard N. Baker on July 14, 1898 for $660,000.

This vessel transported:
        16th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry from Charleston, South Carolina, to Puerto Rico
        6th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Co. D and M, from Charleston, South Carolina, to Puerto Rico
        8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry from Santiago, Cuba to Montauk Point, New York
        22nd U.S. Infantry from Santiago, Cuba to Montauk Point, New York
        9th Illinois Volunteer Infantry from Savannah, Georgia to Havana, Cuba
 
 

MOHAWK
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 Combination
5,658
80
1000
1000
This vessel was purchased for use as a transport  from Bernard N. Baker on July 14, 1898 for $660,000.

This vessel transported:
        8th Ohio, Company from Santiago, Cuba to Montauk Point, Long Island, New York.
        11th U.S. Infantry Co. C from Port Tampa to Puerto Rico
 
 

MORGAN
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
994
     
This vessel was chartered from the Southern Pacific Company from May 12 to August 31, 1898 at the rate of $400 per day.
 
 

MORGAN CITY

Click here to read an account of life aboard the MORGAN CITY
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
2,300
     
This vessel was chartered from the Johnson-Locke Mercantile Company from June 7 to November 3, 1898 at the rate of $660 per day.

This vessel transported the following as part of the Third Philippine Expedition

        1st Idaho Volunteer Infantry
        1st Nebraska Volunteer Infantry (part)
 
 

NEWPORT
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
3,000
30
800
 
This vessel was chartered from the Pacific Mail Steamship Company beginning on June 20, 1898 at the rate of $1,000 per day.

This vessel transported the following as during an early Philippine Expedition:

        3rd U.S. Artillery, Batteries H, K
       Astor Battery

This vessel transported the following as during the Fifth Philippine Expedition:

        1st Washington Volunteer Infantry (part)
        23rd U.S. Infantry (part)
        20th Kansas Volunteer Infantry, Companies A, B, F, L
        California Heavy Artillery
        Wyoming Volunteer Artillery, Battery A
 
 

NUECES
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
3,367
25
800
 800
This vessel was chartered from the New York and Texas Steamship Company from June 13 to September 16, 1898 at the rate of $650 per day.
 
 

OBDAM (Click here for a brief account of life aboard the OBDAM)
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
Troopship
3,656
50
1,300
 100
This vessel was purchased from Samuel D. Coykendall for use as a transport for $250,000 on July 12, 1898.

This vessel transported:

3rd Nebraska Volunteer Infantry,
Headquarters staff of the 1st Battalion staff  (1st Battalion) which included the 3rd Nebraska Volunteer Infantry and some men of the 6th Missouri 1st Battalion from Savanna, Georgia to Cuba.
2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry(9 companies) from Puerto Rico to the U.S. (New York City)
3rd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, from Charleston to Ponce, Puerto Rico


OHIO
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
3,488
 26
 916
 
The vessel was chartered from the Empire Transportation Company beginning on May 27, 1898 at the rate of $25,000. She had been built in 1873, and had a speed of 13.5 knots.

This vessel transported the following from San Francisco to the Philippines as part of the 3rd Philippine Expedition:

        1st Wyoming Volunteer Infantry (part of the unit)
        3rd U.S. Artillery, batteries G, L
        Headquarters staff, and companies C, F, and I of the 18th U.S. Infantry

This vessel transported the following from San Francisco to the Philippines as part of the 5th Philippine Expedition:

        1st Montana Volunteer Infantry (part of the unit)
        1st Washington Volunteer Infantry, Companies A, B, C, D, E, H, K, and M
        2nd Oregon Volunteer Infantry
        4th U.S. Cavalry
        23rd U.S. Infantry
        California Heavy Artillery Detachment (part of the unit)
 

ORIZABA

Click here for an account of a trip on ORIZABA

Click here to read a report describing conditions on the ORIZABA
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
24
 
3,497
 30
 640
 125
The vessel was chartered from the New York and Cuba Mail Steamship Company beginning on May 10, 1898 at the rate of $500 per day. She was returned on Sepetmber 17, 1898.

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 35 officers and 622 enlisted men:
       2nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (one battalion)
       22nd U.S. Infantry from Tampa to Cuba.
       4th U.S. Artillery, Batteries G and H (Siege Artillery battalion)
 

USS PANTHER (note: PANTHER was a U.S. Navy vessel and not an Army Transport. It is merely included for completeness).
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 4,260
 
 
 
This vessel, formerly known as the AUSTIN, was built in 1889. She had a speed of 13 knots.

This vessel transported:

      First Marine Battalion to Cuba
 

PENNSYLVANIA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 3,166
 
 
 
This vessel was chartered from the Empire Transportation Company at a monthly rate of $25,000, beginning on June 7, 1898.

This vessel transported the following from the U.S. to the Philippines:

        1st California Volunteer Infantry (part)
        1st Montana Volunteer Infantry (part)
        1st Nebraska Volunteer Infantry (part)
        14th U.S. Infantry
        18th U.S. Infantry
        51st Iowa Volunteer Infantry
 

PERU
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 3,500
 50
1,000
 
This vessel was chartered from the Pacific Mail Steamship Company at a daily rate of $1,000, from June 25 to November 2, 1898.

This vessel transported the following from the U.S. to the Philippines as part of the 4th Philippine Expedition:

        4th U.S. Cavalry (part)
        6th U.S. Artillery, Batteries D and G
 

RIO GRANDE

Click here for an image of the RIO GRANDE
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 22
 
2,566
50
500
10
This vessel was chartered from the New York and Texas Steamship Company for $500 per day.

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 49 officers and 882 enlisted men:
        1st Cavalry Brigade, Cavalry Divsion, headquarters (General Sumner and staff)
        Lt. Col. Joseph Maxfield (Balloon Signal Detachment) and his balloon apparatus to Cuba (part).
        3rd U.S. Cavalry (8 Troops) to Cuba
        6th U.S. Cavalry (8 Troops) to Cuba
       General Sumner and staff
 

RIO DE JANEIRO

Click here for a letter written aboard the RIO DE JANEIRO
Click here the plan of the day aboard the RIO DE JANEIRO
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 3,548
 
 
 
Launched in 1878, this vessel was chartered from the Pacific Mail Steamship Company on July 7, 1898, and used until October 22, 1898 at a rate of $1,000 per month. She had a speed of 12 to 14 knots.

The vessel reverted back to the Pacific Mail Steamship Company after the war. On February 22, 1901, the vessel was approaching San Francisco, inbound from Hong Kong and Yokohoma, in a fog. Against the suggestions of the pilot, the vessel's captain, William Ward, did not stop the vessel and wait for the conditions to clear while approaching the Golden Gate. Being slightly off course to the south, she struck the rocks near Land's End and Fort Point and sunk in eighteen minutes, with only 81 of her 210 passengers and crew being rescued. One of the major issues was that the Asian crew was unable to understand the orders of the English-speaking officers in the crisis, resulting in lifeboats not being launched, and confusion. There also had been inadequate training in the launching of the boats. The vessel sunk in 320 feet of water. It is now listed on the National Register and is owned by the State of California's State lands Commission.

This vessel transported the following units from San Francisco to Manila, Philippines as part of the 4th Philippine Expedition:

        1st Montana Volunteer Infantry (part of the unit)
        1st South Dakota Volunteer Infantry
        Utah Volunteer Light Artillery (part of the unit)
 

RITA

Click here for an account of the RITA
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 Freighter
 2,194
 15
 700
 
This vessel, captured from the Spanish on May 8, 1898, was purchased on July 8, 1898 for $125,000 and refitted as a transport.

This vessel transported the following:

        6th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Co.C, E(?) G, H K, and L (Charleston, South Carolina to, Cuba and then to Puerto Rico)
 

ROUMANIAN

Click here for a stereoview of the ROUMANIAN
Click here for an account of life aboard ROUMANIAN
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
Combination
4,126
45
1100
50
This vessel was purchased by the U.S. Government for $240,000 from Austin, Baldwin & Co. on July 12, 1898. Following her service in the war, in 1899, ROUMANIAN was used by the government to return the bodies of men who had died in Cuba and Puerto Rico during the war and afterwards. She arrived in late March in New York with the remains of  554 soldiers who were killed or died in Cuba, and 120 from Puerto Rico.  A salute was fired from Governor's Island when the ship arrived.
 

This vessel transported:
        Battery B, Pennsylvania Light Artillery from Newport News, Virginia to Puerto Rico
        Battery A, Missouri Volunteer Artillery from Newport News, Virginia to Puerto Rico
        27th Battery, Indiana Volunteer Artillery from Newport News, Virginia to Puerto Rico
        6th Missouri, 2nd and 3rd battalions from Savannah, Georgia to Cuba
        1st North Carolina Volunteer Infantry to Havana, Cuba
        2nd South Carolina Volunteer Infantry from Savannah, Georgia to Havana, Cuba
        8th U.S. Infantry from Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, Long Island, New York to Alabama
        16th U.S. Infantry from Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, Long Island, New York to Alabama
 
 

ST. LOUIS

Click here for more info. on this vessel
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
14,910
     
This vessel was an American Lines liner converted to an auxiliary cruiser during the war.

      This vessel transported:

        9th U.S. Infantry from Santiago, Cuba to Montauk Point, Long Island, NY (Camp Wikoff)
        10th U.S. Infantry from Santiago, Cuba to Montauk Point, Long Island, NY (Camp Wikoff)
        71st New York Volunteer Infantry (2 companies) from Santiago, Cuba to Montauk Point, Long Island, NY (Camp Wikoff)
 

ST. PAUL
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
2,440
     
This vessel was chartered from the Alaska Commercial Company for $1,000 per day beginning on July 19, 1898

This vessel transported the following as part of the Fourth Philippine Expedition:

        1st Colorado Volunteer Infantry (part)
        1st South Dakota Volunteer Infantry
        13th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry (recruits)
 

ST. PAUL

Click here for more info. on this vessel
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
14,910
     
This vessel was an American Lines liner converted to an auxiliary cruiser during the war.

      This vessel transported:

        2nd U.S. Infantry from Cuba to Montauk Point, Long Island, NY (Camp Wikoff)
        71st New York Volunteer Infantry (part) from Cuba to Montauk Point, Long Island, NY (Camp Wikoff)
        4th Ohio Volunteer Infantry from Hampton Roads to Puerto Rico
        8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry from New York to Cuba
 
 

SAN MARCOS
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 18
 
2,837
 45
 800
350
This vessel was chartered from the New York and Texas Steamship Company fromMay 10 to September 8, 1898 at a rate of $500 per day.

This vessel transported:

        2nd U.S. Infantry (1 Battalion)
        16th U.S. Infantry from Tampa to Cuba
 
 

SANTIAGO
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 2
 
 2,359 tons
 40
 600
 250
The vessel was a former Ward Line steamer (by one account). It was chartered by the government from the New York and Cuba Mail Steamship Co. at the rate of $450.00 per day. The period of the charter lasted from May 10, 1898 to September 3, 1898.

This vessel transported the following:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 51 officers and 739 enlisted men:
        1st Infantry Divsion Headquarters, Staff and Guard (General Kent)
        9th U.S. Infantry from Port Tampa, Florida to Daiquiri, Cuba
        10th U.S. Infantry, First Battalion (Co. A, B, F, H)

        4th U.S. Infantry from Santiago, Cuba to the U.S.
 

SARATOGA

 (To read a report describing conditions on the SARATOGA, click here)
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 20
 
 2,820 tons
 40
 800
 250
The vessel was chartered by the government from the New York and Cuba Mail Steamship Co. at the rate of $450.00 per day. The period of the charter lasted from May 10, 1898 to September 21, 1898.

This vessel transported the following:

     13th U.S. Infantry
     21st U.S. Infantry (headquarters, band and Companies C, D,E, and H)
     Division Hospital #3 (Maj. LaGarde, surgeon)
     Headquarters, 3rd Infantry Brigade, 1st Division
     160th Indiana Volunteer Infantry from Charleston, South Carolina to Matanzas, Cuba
 

SCANDIA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
         
This vessel was purchased from the Hamburg-American Line for $200,000 on July 5, 1898

This vessel transported the following as part of the Fourth Philippine Expedition:

        1st MontanaVolunteer Infantry (part)
        1st New York Volunteer Infantry (Headquarters, band, and Companies A, B, part of Company D  from San Francisco to Honolulu
        California Volunteer Heavy Artillery detachment
 
 

SEGURANCA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
12
 
4,115
35
600
500
SEGURANCA was originally built for the United States and Brazil Steamship Company by the Delaware River Iron, Shipbuilding, and Engine Works at Chester, Pennsylvania. She had triple expansion engines, generating up to 3,000 horsepower, and six "scotch"  boilers. In peacetime, she could carry up to five hundred passengers, three hundred of these in steerage.  SEGURANCA also was originally equipped with an Allen dense air refrigeration system. The vessel was chartered from the New York and Cuba Steam Ship Company for $600 per day. She was built in 1890, and had a speed of between 14 and 14.5 knots..

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 33 officers and 477 enlisted men and 5 oberservers:
        1st U.S. Infantry
        Balloon Signal Detachment (part)
        General Shafter and his staff (5th Corps Headquarters)
        Foreign military observors to Cuba
 

SENECA

Click here for an image and account of life aboard SENECA
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
5
 
2,820
27
600
250
This vessel was chartered from the New York and Cuba Steam Ship Company for $450 per day. She was built in 1884, and had a speed of 11-14 knots.

This vessel transported:

        4th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry to Puerto Rico (part of regiment)
        71st New York Volunteer Infantry to from New York to Hoboken (?)

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 32 officers and 656 enlisted men:
        2nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
        8th U.S. Infantry (2 companies)
        Headquarters 1st Infantry Brigade, 2nd Division
 

SENATOR
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
2,409
43
957
 
This vessel was chartered from the Pacific Coast Steamship Company for $1,000 per day on June 8, 1898.

This vessel transported the following as part of the Second Philippine Expedition:

       1st Nebraska Volunteer Infantry (part)

This vessel transported the following as part of the Fifth Philippine Expedition:

        1st Montana Volunteer Infantry
        1st Nebraska Volunteer Infantry (part)
        1st South Dakota Volunteer Infantry
        1st Tennessee Volunteer Infantry
        13th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry (part)
        14th U.S. Infantry, (detachment)
        18th U.S. Infantry (detachment)
        20th Kansas Volunteer Infantry
        23rd U.S. Infantry, Companies A, I, K, M
        California Volunteer Artillery, Battery D.

This vessel as transported part of the 10th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry to the U.S. from the Philippines

This vessel transported the 51st Iowa Volunteer Infantry from Manila to San Francisco in 1899.
 

SHINNECOCK
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
1,205
   
 
This steamer was chartered from the Montauk Steamboat Company for $1,000 per day from August 30 to September 22, 1898. She was chartered for use in the vicinity of Camp Wikoff, Montauk Point, Long Island, New York.

The vessel carried sick soldiers from Camp Wikoff to New York City.
 

STILLWATER
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
         
 

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried Troop A, 2nd U.S. Cavalry
 

TACOMA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
   
1,738
   
 
This vessel was chartered from the Alaska Packers Association beginning on July 11, 1898 at a rate of $200 a day. She was unique in that she was the only sailing vessel chartered as a transport during the war
 
 

VALENCIA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
1,198
29
606
This vessel was chartered from the Pacifica Steam Whaling Company on June 19, 1898 at the rate of $650 per day

The vessel transported the following from San Francisco to the Philippines as part of the Third Philippine Expedition:

        1st North Dakota Volunteer Infantry (left June 28, with 686 men, part of the regiment).
        1st Washington Volunteer Infantry, Companies F, G, I, L
        California Heavy Artillery, Batteries A, D
 

VIGILANCIA
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
23
 
4,115
45
800
This vessel was built in 1890 and had a speed of 14-14.5 knots.

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 44 officers and 954 enlisted men:
        71st New York Volunteer Infantry from Tampa, Florida to Cuba
 

WANDERER
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
   
1,019
45
800
This was chartered from the New Orleans Belize Royal Mail Steamship Company from July 5 to September 10, 1898 at a rate of $220 a day.
 

WHITNEY

Click here for an account of life aboard WHITNEY
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 10
 
1,337
20
250
250
This vessel was chartered from the Southern Pacific Company at the rate of $350 per day.

This vessel transported:

Company E of the 11th U.S. Infantry From Tampa to Puerto Rico

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 44 officers and 954 enlisted men:
        10 teamsters (and a supply of horses?)
 

YALE
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 Auxiliary Cruiser
10,669
 
 
 
The vessel, the PARIS before being renamed by the Navy, was chartered from the International Navigation Company.

This vessel transported:
        33rd Michigan Volunteer Infantry from Fort Monroe, VA to Siboney, Cuba
        34th Michigan Volunteer Infantry, Companies F, I, K and L  from Fort Monroe, VA to Siboney, Cuba
        6th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Co. A, from Charleston, South Carolina to Guanica, Puerto Rico
        6th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry from Charleston, South Carolina to Guanica, Puerto Rico
        7th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, from New York to Santiago de Cuba
        8th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, from New York to Santiago de Cuba
 

YARMOUTH
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
 
 
 
 

This vessel transported:
        2nd South Carolina Volunteer Infantry, Companies I, K, L and M from Cuba to Savannah, Georgia
 
 

YUCATAN

Click here for an account and photo of the YUCATAN nearly ramming the MATTEAWAN
 
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
8
 
3,525
45
1000
250
This vessel was built in 1890, and had a speed of 14 knots.

This vessel transported:

For the invasion of Cuba, she carried the following consisting of 43 officers and 733 enlisted men:
        1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry ("Rough Riders," 8 Troops) to Cuba
        2nd U.S. Infantry, Companies B, C, D, G, band and Headquarters (B and D relocated to the CLINTON)
        2 Colt Automatic guns; one dynamite gun.
 

ZEELANDIA (Sometimes listed ZEALANDIA)
 
 
 
 
Capacity
 
Transport Number
Vessel class
Displacement
# Officers
# Men
# Horses
 
 
2,489
50
750
 
This vessel was chartered from the Oceanic Streamship Company on May 27, 1898 at a rate of $20,000 per month.

This vessel transported the following as part of the Second Philippine Expedition:

        10th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry to the Philippines (part)
        Utah Light Artillery, Battery B, Sections 1, 2 and 6

This vessel transported the following as part of the Fifth Philippine Expedition:

        13th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry (part)
        23rd U.S. Infantry (part)
 
 


Bibliography:

(As a service to our readers, clicking on title in red will take you to that book on Amazon.com)

Alger, Russell A, The Spanish American War. (New York: Harper & brothers Publishers, 1901) 76-79.

Anderson, James Buchanan, Personal Diary, contributed by Claiborne M. Stokes (11th Infantry, Co. E information)

A Reply to the Spaniards, Herald-Despatch. Decatur, Illinois, July 30, 1898, 1 (info. on the 27th Battery, Indiana Volunteer Artillery; Battery B, Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, and Battery A, Missouri Volunteer Artillery on the ROUMANIAN)

Bowers, George B.,  History of the 160th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. (The 160th Indiana on the SARATOGA; contributed by Lynard Fontenot).

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, July 23, 1890, 1 [SEGURANCA]; August 22, 1898, . 4 [CATANIA, MARTERRA]; August 13, 1899. [BAY STATE], August 14, 1898 [GATE CITY], August 15, 1898 [ST. PAUL and ST. LOUIS].

Clerk of the Joint Committee on Printing, The Abridgement: Message from the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress. (Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1899) Vol I,  394-397, 398 [Bay State], 457, 482, 616 [BAY STATE], 670-671; Vol. 3, 270, 665.

Correspondence Relating to the War with Spain Including the Insurrection in the Philippine Islands and the China Relief Expedition April 15, 1898 to July 30, 1902. Vol. 1 (Washington DC: Center for Military History, 1993) 623. (2nd Wisconsin)

DeBurgh, Joseph, "A Few Reminiscences of the First Expedition of American Troops to Manila", The American Oldtimer. Vol VI, No. 6. April 1939, 23-29. (info. on troops on the City of Sidney).

"Fallen Heroes, " Knoxville Journal and Tribune. March 24, 1899 (info.on ROUMANIAN returning the dead from Cuba and Puerto Rico in 1899)(contributed by Jeff Berry)

Faust, Karl Irving, Campaigning in the Philippines (San Francisco: The Hicks-Judd Company, 1899) 63-67 (courtesy of Sheri Baker).

Fesler, James E., The War With Spain (unpublished diary/manuscript concerning the 33rd Michigan; courtesy of Sue Lumb).

Freidel, Frank, The Splendid Little War, Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1958.

Hard, Curtis V. (Robert H. Ferrell, ed.), Banners in the Air. (Kent OH: Kent State University Press, 1988)(8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry)

 Helmick, Eli Al. Helmick, Major General, United States Army, Retired. From Reveille to Retreat. 1935. (unpublished autobiography - info. on the 10th U.S. and the ALAMO). Info. contributed by Florence West.

Herrman, Karl Stephen, From Yauco to Las Maries. (Kessinger Publishing) 38, 40 (data on the return of the 5th U.S. Artillery, Battery D on the Comanche and the return of Thomas Schwan on the Chester).

"History of the Sixth Regiment Missouri Volunteer Infantry" (St. Louis, Mo.: Woodward & Tiernan printing Co., 1899) 10, 14,17. (contributed by Patty Meis).

Howard-Smith, Logan and J. F. Reynolds Scott, The History of Battery A and Troops A, N. G. P. (Philadelphia: The John C. Winston Co., 1912) 185

Jackson, Robert, Liners, Tankers & Merchant Ships. (New York: Barnes & Noble, 2002) 198 (Info. on Arizona)

James, Harry - Image of stern of CHESTER

Jeffers, H. Paul, Colonel Roosevelt: Theodore Roosevelt Goes to War, 1897-1898. (New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1996). 207

Lawrie, Rene Lewis, letter of Morgan James Lewis (concerning ORIZABA)

Log of the Yankee, Part 2 (info. on CHEROKEE, YALE)

Maguire, James, Biography of John Hommel (3rd Wisconson on OBDAM and GRAND DUSCHESSE)

McIntoch, Burr, The Little I Saw of Cuba. (New York: F. Tennyson Neely, 1899). (image from this source also).

Mitiuckov, Nick (personal correspondence with author)

Morton & Watkins, History of Nebraska (Contributed by Marilyn Estrada). (Info. on 3rd Nebraska).

New York Times - September 20, 1898 [1st and 2nd U.S. Infantry on BERLIN; Troops on CHESTER; SHINNECOCK, 8th and 16th U.S. on ROUMANIAN]

The Philo Literary Society, The Philo Review. Vol XXIII, No. 32 (Shippensburg: State Normal School, 1899) 67-73.

Post, Charles Johnson, The Little War of Private Post : The Spanish-American War Seen Up Close. (Univ of Nebraska Press, 1999). (71st New York info, 2nd Masschusetts on the CITY of WASHINGTON) 30, 69, 271,292, 298.

Pratt, E. Warren, Official History of the Ohio National Guard and Ohio Volunteers:  The United States Volunteers in 1898-99, including a History of each Local Organization and each Regimental Formation from its Inception to the Present Time. (Cleveland, Ohio: The Plain Dealer Publishing Co., 1901) (8th Ohio on Mobile).

RIO DE JANEIRO loss: http://mall15.register.com/mariti/ships/ss.html ; http://laws.lp.findlaw.com/getcase/US/269/364.html ; "The Golden Gate Wreck," The Age. Fenbruary 15, 1901. http://www.cr.nps.gov/aad/submerged/NRShips.htm

Schuster, M. A. J., Jr., Personal diary, manuscript, p. 12. Contributed by Patty Meis.

Spokesfield, The History of Wells Co., North Dakota and its Pioneers. (info. concerning the 1st North Dakota, contributed by Carolyn Upchurch).

St. Paul War Budget. (ship's newpaper of the U.S.S. ST. PAUL) - Data on the 4th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

"Transports Coming and Going" Herald-Despatch. [Decatur, Illinois], December 2, 1898, p. 1 [Info. on Transport Michigan]

The Weekly Northwestern, Oshkosh, Saturday, July 23, 1898 (info. on 2nd, 3rd Wisconsin, and the 6th Illinois)

"Wisconsin Troops In the Spanish War"  reprinted from The Sentinel Almanac and Book Of Facts for the year 1899. (concerning the 2nd and 3rd Wisconsin, and contibuted by Mike Philips).


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