A Brief History of the 1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry

Compiled Originally By: Gen. J. W. Floyd, Adjutant General

Contributed by Micah J. Jenkins Camp No. 164, Sons of Spanish American War Veterans, courtesy of Kenneth H. Robison II



The members of the 1st South Carolina holding a Bible Class during the Spanish Ameriacn War.

Click here to visit the Micah J. Jenkins Camp No. 164, S.S.A.W.V.

Click here for a roster of the 1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry
Click here for histories of individual companies in the regiment

If you have additional info. on this regiment, please contact us

General:

The 1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry served its term of service in the continental U.S.

The regiment was mustered into federal service between May 10 and May 26, 1898. At the time of mustering in the regiment consisted of forty-seven officers and 951 enlisted men. At the time of mustering out on November 10, 1898, the regiment had forty-nine officers and 1,140 enlisted men. During its term of service, the regiment lost one officer and eighteen enlisted men to disease. In addition, twelve men were discharged on disability and thrity-five men deserted.

Below is a history of the regiment written by the regiment's officers. Typical of some regimental histories, the article glasses over the negative issues. The article merely touches on some of the racial issues that resulted from the appearance of African American officers, for instance. Also, the history makes reference to Camp Thomas, indicating that Camp Thomas "would be one of the finest camping grounds in the world if only a few feet higher." In fact, by the time the regiment left Camp Thomas, the camp was being cleared because the conditions were deplorable. The camp had housed over 30,000 men, and the sanitary and supply facilities were completely overwhelmed, resulted in a rise in disease and death.

Still, the article provides good information on the travels and experiences of the members of the regiment.

The History:

"[Following the loss of the MAINE in Havana harbor, Cuba] ....Congress being in session at the time, the report of the Committee [investigating the loss of the MAINE] was carefully examined by the august body, and as a result war was declared between the United States and Spain. The President immediately issued a call for volunteers, consisting of 125,000, and South Carolina’s quota was found at one regiment of infantry, one battalion of infantry, and one battery of heavy artillery. Gov. Wm. H. Ellerbe, Commander-in-Chief of the military forces of South Carolina, in compliance with orders from the President, issued a call for the aforesaid organization, and only a short lapse of time intervened before the organization that was destined to for the 1st S.C.V.I. [1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry] were on their way to the place of rendezvous. The question of mobilization was now at fever heat between Gov. Ellerbee, who insisted that the troops would be assembled at Columbia, S.C., and the Secretary of War, who announced Charleston, S.C., as the objective point. Gov. Ellerbe stubbornly held to his first idea-Columbia being the centre of the State and easily accessible by railroad, and in a few days the Washington authorities yielded to his wishes. About two miles from the city of Columbia, at a beautiful suburban village known as Hyatt’s Park, which is connected by the electric street railway and a broad macadam road with Columbia, was established the main camp known as “Camp Ellerbe”, in honor of Gov. Ellerbe, where the troops composing the 1st South Carolina were to be assembled and mustered into the U.S. Service by Capt. Ezra B. Fuller, 7th U.S. Cavalry, chief mustering officer. On the third day of May, 1898, the Governor appointed the officers of the 1st S.C.V.I., comprising the field and staff, and the rendezvous having been selected at Columbia, things began to put on a more warlike appearance; and on the afternoon of May 3, 1898, the first three companies arrived in Columbia and were soon quartered at Camp Ellerbe. The three companies were the Abbeville Volunteers, the Johnson Rifles, and the Newberry Guards, commanded by Capts. Milford, Hunter, and Langford , respectively. Following in rapid succession came the remaining companies of the 1st S.C.V.I. as follows: the Catawba Rifles, of Rock Hill, Capt., Fred Mobley; the Lee Light Infantry, of Chester, Capt. Jos. S. Hardin; the Greenville Guards, Capt. A.D. Hoke ; the Butler Guards, Capt. O.K. Mauldin; the Anderson Volunteers, Capt. H.H. Watkins; the Richland Volunteers, Capt. Chas. Newnham; the Sumter Light Infantry, Capt. L.S. Carson; the Governor's Guards, Capt. B.B. McCreery, and the Palmetto Rifles, Capt. Claude E. Sawyer. Col. Jos. K. Alston assumed command of all the volunteer troops assembled at Columbia, S.C., by the issuing of the following order:

"Headquarters Camp Ellerbee,
May 7, 1898.
Gen. O. No. 1,

In Pursuance of orders received from his Excellency the Governor, I hereby assume command of all volunteer State troops assembled in Columbia, in accordance with the proclamation of the Governor.
Jos. K. Alston,
Col., 1st S.C.V.I."

Camp Ellerbee being headquarters, there was established a camp at the Fair Grounds, in command of Lt. Col. Jas. H. Tillman, which served as an auxiliary camp for the recruiting and mustering of companies before being sent to Camp Ellerbe. There emanated from the camp at the Fair Grounds an order known as Gen. Order No. 1, which would have caused consternation had it been promulgated before the troops were mustered in, particularly paragraph two, which read as follows: "All Captains are further ordered to give each and every man in his command a shower bath at one of the hydrants in the either of the barracks, at least once a day." "Cleanliness being next to godliness," this was a good order if carried out, besides, a very amusing one when read.

The 1st S.C.V.I. volunteered their patriotic services to fight for their country wherever the Stars and Stripes floated, and should they have received the chance, they would have grasped the first favorable opportunity, and by their pluck, heroism, and fighting qualities, instilled and bred in them by their fathers, would have won their laurels and spurs on any battlefield, and would have merited the praise well done. The hardest and most severe battle we had to contend with was the U.S. Surgeons, who had the eyes of an eagle, and facing them was like bringing the ox to the slaughter--as many as fifty men being rejected out of a hundred. One very witty Irish lad, whose eyes and head were being examined, look up pleadingly
at the surgeon and said, "Say, pard, I thought you were examining me for fighting and not butting." The lad was rejected at once without further examination. The battle with the surgeons lasted for several days, and some of the boys eager to obey their country's call, and knowing that their comrades had passed examination, were so intent on being mustered in, that they placed lead and such articles in their pockets, in order that they would not be turned down on weight.

The first man to be accepted and mustered into the service of the United States was Adjt. Jno. D. Frost, Jr., on the morning of the 4th of May, 1898. And in quick succession the officers and companies were made a part of the volunteer army of the United States until June 2d, 1898, when Col. Jos. K. Alston was mustered into service, thus completing the 1st S.C.V.I. The men were then clad in civilians dress and anxiously awaiting the issuing of uniforms, in order that they might present a more soldierly appearance. The regiment was fed by contract up to the day of muster, and at times the meals were good and at other times very scant, but the officers did all in their power to make things as comfortable as possible. Drilling was immediately commenced, and it was but a short time before material progress was clearly demonstrated. Excellent bathing pools were erected at Hyatt's Park, which were a great source of comfort and pleasure to the men after a hard day's drilling or guard duty, and it is needless to say that they were liberally patronized. During the concentration of troops at Columbia, smallpox was raging, and compulsory vaccination had to be enforced, and in a short while the soldiers of the 1st S.C. were carrying their arms in allings, and for several days drills, etc., were practically suspended; some of the soldiers' arms were a pitiful sight from the effects of vaccination. Evening parades were started in the 1st S.C. camp on the 29th of May, and were largely attended by the ladies of Columbia, which was enjoyed to the fullest extent by all the troops at "Camp Ellerbe," and in the short interval of time that the soldiers had been drilling, it was easy for the officers as well as spectators to see that the 1st S.C.V.I. bid fair to be one of the most efficient regiments in the volunteer service. On the 3d day of June, 1898, Mr. A.G. Knebel had a large tent erected in camp, to be known as the Y.M.C.A. tent, which proved to be one of the greatest benefits in camp, on account of the reading and writing facilities furnished by Secretary Knebel, who was untiring in his efforts to promote the comfort of the soldiers. Mr. Knebel was twenty-five years old, and was born in Texas; the whole regiment became attached to him for his gracious acts of kindness, his indefatigable work, and his gentlemanly conduct to all whose  pleasure it was to meet him. The 1st S.C.V.I. was also well provided fro in the way of war correspondence, viz: Mr. August Kohn, of The News and Courier, and Mr. Wm. Banks, of The Columbia State. Mr. Kohn is a son of Mr. Theodore Kohn, a Confederate soldier, of Orangeburg, S.C., and was furnished with a correspondent’s pass signed by R.A. Alger, Secretary of War, May 18, 1898, and countersigned by Maj. Gen. Brooke, 1st Army Corps. Mr. Wm. Banks is a son of Mr. A.R. Banks, of Rock Hill, S.C., a Confederate soldier, and was enrolled as a Corporal in Co. G, 1st S.C.V.I. All honor is due these correspondents, who were with the regiment, and by their careful and diligent works kept the parents, wives, sisters, brothers, and sweethearts in close touch with the boys who went forward to fight for their country wherever duty might call them. Messrs. Kohn and Banks having the distinguished pleasure of representing two of the best and ablest journals in the Southern States, viz: The News and Courier and The State.

Constant daily drills and guard duty at Camp Ellerbe worked to great advantage towards perfecting the soldiers in the task they had volunteered to perform, and the regiment being mustered in, everybody now rested on the anxious bench, awaiting the orders to move. Telegraphic instructions from the War Department, ordering the moving by rail of the 1st S.C.V.I. from Camp Ellerbe, Columbia, S.C., to Camp Thomas, Ga., had the effect of pouring oil on the troubled sea. The men had long been waiting and anxiously expecting the orders to move, and at parade on the evening of the 5th of June, a General Order was published by Col. Jos. K. Alston, whereby the regiment left Columbia on the 6th day of June, 1898, and marched to the Union depot, where trains awaited their arrival. Along the march the crowds who lined the streets gave the regiment prolonged cheers, and at the depot the crowd was so dense that the soldiers could scarcely board the trains. Two sections left by the South Carolina and Georgia Railroad and the remaining two by the Southern, and arrived at Camp Thomas June 7, 1898. People turned out en masse to greet the soldiers as they passed the depots on their way to the front, and at several stationed eatables and refreshments were served them by the thoughtful and admiring public. As soon as we reached Chickamauga Par, which would be one of the finest camping grounds in the world if only a few feet higher, the signs of war prevailed on all sides. First was a corral of young mules, branded U.S., numbering 1,800 or more, and wagons in proportion. Upon reporting to Gen. Brook, our regiment was assigned to the 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps, and we marched about two and a half miles through the park to our camp, and were received with vociferous cheers by the regiments already in camp along the route we passed. One regiment, which was stationed close to the turnpike road, yelled out, “Where are you from?” and some of the boys said “South Carolina,” in a rather calm voice: when the boys, our neighbors in blue, yelled in a voice that made the welkin ring, “Why don’t you say South Carolina?” and you could have heard it for miles. We arrived in our camp late in the afternoon, some of the sections not reaching camp before midnight-consequently everything was “topsy-turvy” until the morning of the 8th of June, when a beautiful camp was laid off and all the tents were pitched, under the directions of Adj. Frost, and the 1st S.C.V.I. was then quartered in a new home among the tall and battle-scarred oaks of Chickamauga Park.

When the regiment arrived at Camp Thomas it had comparatively no equipments, but received many praises for its discipline, etc., as the following quotation from the Chattanooga Times will show, in speaking of the 1st S.C.V.I.: “Whatever this regiment may have lacked in the way of equipment, they make up for in discipline, which was far better than that of any other volunteer regiment now at the park. Their manner of leaving the train and receiving coffee reminded one of the regulars, if not better than the regulars. The companies act like parts of a machine, responding readily and easily to every command.”

On the 10th day of June, uniforms were issued to the 1st S.C.V.I., and they never came too soon. The boys were elated over the fact that they had only been here three days before a complete uniform was furnished them; and when clad in the regulation blue, they were as fine looking a regiment as any stationed at Camp Thomas, or in the Service.

On the 17th of June, 1898, Adj. Frost was talking of the thousand questions asked him a day, when Lieut. Jack Harvard, of Co. K, walked up and consolingly said: “Say, look here, if you don’t have anything to do, my friend, just come down my way some time, and see what I have to contend with. They being just after reveille, with lightning-like rapidity, and here are some of the questions continually asked: ‘Do I have to go back on that water detail this morning?’ ‘How long before breakfast?’ ‘I never had any supper last night; can’t the cook give me a little snack now?’ ‘I can eat rocks, I am so hungry.’ Then another fellow asks: ‘Is that fellow that is going to lend us those three dollars, is he coming over here to Chickamauga?’ In a minute another asks: ‘Do I have to go on duty?’ Another, ‘Have you got a stamp?’ ‘When is the paymaster a coming?’ And here is the one that kills: ‘Can I resign now, as I did not know what was in those articles of war?’ ‘Do you have to salute nigger lieutenants?’ ‘Do you have to dance to every one of those dinky little corporal and sergeants?’ And another general question is: ‘Do you know who stole my blanket?’ This is a sample of the questions propounded before breakfast, and it continues all day until taps at night.”

Our regiment had the good fortune to be under the command of excellent officers as brigade commanders-noteworthy among these was General Sanger, who did more to advance the efficiency in drill, etc., than any brigade commander at Camp Thomas. He is considered one of the best soldiers in the United States Army, and clearly proved himself as such in the eyes of the 1st S.C.

The men in our regiment established quire a reputation for themselves at target practice, and when the score was completed stood second at Camp Thomas.

The most welcome visitor of all appeared at camp on the 2nd day of July, and left behind him a distribution of $40,000 among the 1st S.C. Regiment, and it goes without saying that many a soul was made happy and many hearts made glad, as this was our first pay day since the regiment was mustered into service.

The regiment having been thoroughly equipped, it was not long before it was considered the second best at brigade headquarters, and one of the best in the First Army Corps. Gen. Sanger was delighted with the progress made by the 1st S.C., and seemed especially gratified when on division review at Snodgrass Hill, only two of the South Carolina boys had to fall by the wayside, after marching eight miles in the hot sun, while some of the regiments lost as many as 200, from exhaustion. This clearly demonstrates the fact that the largest men do not always make the best soldiers. The quick and wiry step was very noticeable in our regiment, as compared with the others, whose time without warning was caught at 112 to the minute, and that of the 1st S.C. was 121 to the minute, as recorded by Gen. Sanger, while the step required by the regulations is 120 per minute. The 1st S.C.V.I. having worked hard and drilled well at Camp Thomas, and being eager for the fray, were very much gratified when an order came detaching them from the 1st Army Corps and ordering them to Jacksonville, Fla., to join the 7th Army Corps, under Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. The whole camp went wild with enthusiasm, thinking that this move would surely place them on the fighting line in a short while; but, much to their sorry, they were again sidetracked at Panama Park, Fla. The Regiment left Camp Thomas and marched to Rossville, a distance of six miles, and there boarded the trains for Florida on the 28th of July, 1898, and arrived July 29, and in a short while were in camp on the banks of the St. John River-where fishing and bathing were greatly enjoyed after duties were done. Upon our arrival at Camp Cuba Libre, Fla., we were ordered out for parade the next afternoon and were reviewed by Gen. Hubbard, who proclaimed it the best parade he had witnessed at Panama Park.

The Nebraska regiment was stationed near our regiment, and it was the pleasure of the writer of this article to meet frequently and exchange calls with Wm. J. Bryan, the great statesman, who would draw a figure of stone to him by his personal magnetism. The band of the 1st S.C.V.I. was one of the best in the volunteer service, and was frequently complimented as such. The writer of this article had the honor of commanding the band for a long time, and became very much attached to each member on account of their gentlemanly conduct and general deportment. And I can truthfully say that the 1st S.C. had a band that they might well be proud of and was second to none in the service.

Our regiment remained at Camp Cuba Libre, Fla., until September 21, 1898, when, in compliance with G.O. 130, A.G.O., it was prepared to be mustered out of the service, and left camp in three sections for Columbia, S.C., the place of rendezvous, and arrived on the 22d of September, where we were encamped at “Camp Fuller,” named in honor of Capt. E. B. Fuller, until the day of muster-out. The regiment was furloughed for thirty days from September 28 to October 28, inclusive, except a guard and all officers, who were kept on waiting orders, in order that the muster-out rolls might be made out and final settlements made with the Government. Capt. Ezra B. Fuller, in whose hands we were entrusted, was the most gallant soldier and splendid gentleman it has ever been my pleasure to meet; thoroughly competent, courteous, kind and obliging, he won a soft spot in the heart of every soldier. I therefore know that I voice the sentiments of the entire regiment when I say that the 1st S.C.V.I. wishes him a safe and prosperous career, and that our homes are his whenever he sees fit to again visit the Palmetto State.

 The 1st S.C.V.I., who volunteered through patriotic motives to travel the paths emblazoned by their illustrious sire on many a bloody field, and who were deprived of that solemn duty, I know not why, were mustered out of service at Columbia, S.C., on the 10th day of November, 1898, by Capt. Ezra B. Fuller, chief mustering officer. In the writer’s opinion, though humble it may be, there never left the borders of the old Palmetto State a regiment more willing to do honor for the cause for which they volunteered, and I am doubly sure that had the chance presented itself the regiment, as a unit, would have merited the praise well done.

 Having reached the end of the pleasant task assigned me, of writing a sketch of the 1st S.C. Regiment in the Spanish-American War, of which I was a member, my heart swells with emotion and I retrospect the past and bring to memory’s view the happy scenes, the joyous bivouac, the march, the travels, the sweet associations, the new made friendships grown to be old and true, as only a soldier can understand and appreciate. And still a sadder thought intrudes itself-the Regiment is disbanded, the members scattered here and there, lost in the ever increasing multitude of population, never to be gathered together again as the same old 1st. Some have already “passed beyond the river,” and some in distant fields of occupation outside the limits of their native State. Yes, many of us-the large majority, perhaps-will never meet again to grasp the hand, and revive those pleasant memories. But however true the passing reflections, I shall yet hope in this life to meet many of my old comrades of the 1st; and as long as life lasts, I shall never forget the obedience, respect, and the deference shown me by all the boys, as Major of the 1st Regiment. And the officers, too, I shall always remember with the deepest respect and friendship, for the courtesy and attention they always extended me. Dear old 1st, a fond adieu! And to officers and enlisted men alike I say, God speed in all the relations of life.

Very truly yours,
John D. Frost,
Major 1st S.C.V.I.
 

Itinerary of the 1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry:

The First S.C.V.I. was enrolled and mustered into service June 2d, 1898. Moved by rail, in compliance with telegraphic instructions from the War Department, from Columbia, S.C., to Chickamauga, Park, Ga., a distance of 384 miles, June 6th, 1898. Arriving on the 7th of June, 1898, and was assigned to duty with the 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps. Moved by rail from Rossville, Ga., to Jacksonville, Fla., July 28, 1898, per Special Order No. 57, A.G.O., 1st Army Corps, Maj. Gen. Wade, a distance of 487 miles, and arrived at Jacksonville, Fla., [Camp Cuba Libre] July 30, 2 P.M., and was assigned to duty with the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, 7th Army Corps, Gen. Lee. Moved by rail from Jacksonville, Fla., to Columbia, S.C., the place of rendezvous, for muster out, per G.O. 124, A.G.O. Had no casualties in transit, arriving at Columbia, S.C., September 24, 1898. The regiment was then furloughed for thirty days, per G.O. 130, A.G.O., September 29, 1898-all officers being kept on waiting orders. The regiment was after the expiration of furlough mustered out of service at Columbia, S.C., on November 10th, 1898, by Capt. Ezra B. Fuller, of the 7th U.S. Cavalry, chief mustering officer."

Additional Company Information:

Company A, "Abbeville Volunteers" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

 The “Abbeville Volunteers” were organized at Abbeville, South Carolina, in the month of May, 1898, and mustered into service at Columbia, South Carolina, May 10th, 1898, as Company A, 1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry Regiment. They left the State Camp at Columbia, South Carolina, on June 6th, 1898, and moved by rail for Camp George H. Thomas, Chickamauga Park, Georgia, arriving on June 7th, 1898, and remained in camp there until July 28th, 1898, when company left by rail for Camp Cuba Libre, Panama Park, Florida, arriving on July 10th, 1898. Company A was detailed on special duty as provost guards at Jacksonville, Florida, from August 13th to August 23rd, 1898, inclusive. Left Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, September 23rd, 1898, for Columbia, South Carolina, by rail, arriving September 24th, 1898, where the company was furloughed for thirty days, except a guard from September 29th to October 29th, 1898, per General Order No. 130, Adjutant Generals Office, 1st Regiment. From organization to day of muster-out, this company has not lost a single soldier. At the expiration of furlough, during which officers were on waiting orders, the company was mustered out at Columbia, South Carolina, on November 10th, 1898, by Captain Ezra B. Fuller, Captain 7th United States Cavalry.

Company B, "Newberry Guards" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

The “Newberry Guards” were organized on May 3rd, 1898 at Newberry, South Carolina and traveled from thence by rail to Columbia, South Carolina, where it went into camp, and was mustered into service the 11th of May, 1898. Remained in camp until June 6th, 1898, when it moved by rail, as a part of the 1st S.C.V.I., to Chickamauga Park, Georgia, and remained at Camp George H. Thomas, Georgia, until July 28th, 1898, when ordered with regiment to Camp Cuba Libre, Panama Park, Florida, and arrived the following day. The Company remained in camp at Panama Park, Florida, until September 24th, 1898, and then moved by rail with regiment to Columbia, South Carolina, arriving September 25th, 1898; was then furloughed for thirty days from September 29th, 1898, except guard, and all officers on waiting orders; at the expiration of furlough the company was mustered out of service at Columbia, South Carolina, at the place of rendezvous, November 10th, 1898, by the chief mustering officer, Ezra B. Fuller, Captain 7th United States Cavalry.

Company C, "Anderson Volunteers" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

The “Anderson Volunteers” were organized at Anderson, South Carolina, on April 27th, 1898 and proceeded from thence by rail on May 4th, 1898 to Columbia, South Carolina, where it was mustered into service on May 12th, 1898, by Captain Ezra B. Fuller, chief mustering officer. Remained in camp at Columbia, South Carolina, until June 6th, 1898, when it proceeded to Camp Thomas, Georgia, with regiment, arriving June 7th, 1898, and was attached to the 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps. Remained at Camp Thomas, Georgia, until July 29th, 1898, and moved by rail from Rossville, Georgia, to Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, and was there attached to the 7th Army Corps, under General Fitzhugh Lee, being in the 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division. Left Camp Cuba Libre by rail, September 24th, 1898, for Columbia, South Carolina, the place of rendezvous, and was there mustered out of service by Ezra B. Fuller, Captain, 7th United States Cavalry, on November 10th, 1898. Upon arriving at Columbia, the company was furloughed for thirty days from September 29th, except a guard and all officers, who were on waiting orders.

Company D, "Lee Light Infantry" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

The “Lee Light Infantry” were organized at Chester, South Carolina, in the month of May, 1898, and left for Columbia, South Carolina, May 4th, 1898, and was there mustered into service on May 12th, 1898, as Company D, 1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry Regiment. They moved by rail from Columbia, South Carolina, to Camp George H. Thomas, Chickamauga Park, Georgia, on June 6th, 1898; and remained in camp there until July 29th, 1898. From there they moved by rail to Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, and upon arrival were assigned to the 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps. They removed by rail from Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, to Columbia, South Carolina, on September 24th, 1898, and was there furloughed for thirty days, from September 29th; at the expiration of which the company was mustered out of service by Ezra B. Fuller, Captain, 7th United States Cavalry. During thirty days furlough the officers were on waiting orders.

Company E, "Johnson Rifles" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

 The “Johnson Rifles” were organized at Union, South Carolina, and left for Columbia, South Carolina, on May 3rd, 1898; was mustered into service on the 12th of May, 1898. Left Columbia by rail for Camp George H. Thomas, Georgia, June 6th, 1898, and was there assigned to duty with the 1st Army Corps. Left Chickamauga Park on July 29th, 1898 for Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, and was attached to the 7th Army Corps under General Lee. Left Florida for Columbia, South Carolina, the place of rendezvous, September 24th, and upon arrival was furloughed for thirty days, except a guard and the officers who were on waiting orders. At the expiration of furlough, which was from September 29th to October 29th, the company was mustered out of service by Ezra B. Fuller, Captain, 7th United States Cavalry, on the 10th day of November 1898.

Company F, "Greenville Guards" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

 The “Greenville Guards” were organized at Greenville, South Carolina, on April 24th, 1898, and left for Columbia, South Carolina, on May 4th, 1898, where it was mustered into service May 13th, 1898, by Captain Ezra B. Fuller, chief mustering officer. Remained in Camp Ellerbe, at Columbia, South Carolina, until June 6th, 1898, when it proceeded by rail to Camp George H. Thomas, Georgia, and was there assigned to duty with the 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps. Left Camp Thomas, Georgia, July 29th, 1898, for Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, by rail, and was assigned to duty with the 7th Army Corps, under General Lee. Left Florida for Columbia, South Carolina, rendezvous, September 4th, 1898; was furloughed for thirty days from September 29th, except guard and officers, who were on waiting orders; was mustered out of service November 10th, 1898, by Captain Ezra B. Fuller, 7th United States Cavalry, at Columbia, South Carolina

Company G, "Catawba Rifles" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

 The “Catawba Rifles” were organized at Rock Hill, York County, South Carolina, and ordered to Columbia, South Carolina, by rail May 4th, 1898, where it was mustered into service May 14th, 1898, by Captain Ezra B. Fuller, 7th Cavalry, as Company G, 1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Moved by rail from Columbia, South Carolina, to Camp Thomas, Georgia, June 6th, 1898, and there remained in camp until July 29th, 1898, when it proceeded by rail to Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, and was assigned to 7th Army Corps, under General Lee. Left Florida for Columbia, September 24th, 1898, place of rendezvous, and was furloughed for thirty days from September 29th, 1898, except guard and officers, who were on waiting orders. At the expiration of furlough the company was mustered out at Columbia, South Carolina, November 10th, 1898, by Captain Ezra B. Fuller, 7th Cavalry, mustering officer.

Company H, "Butler Guards" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

The “Butler Guards” were organized at Greenville, South Carolina, and left for Columbia, South Carolina, on 4th of May, 1898, where it was mustered into service May 15th, 1898, by Ezra B. Fuller, Captain, 7th Cavalry. On June 6th, it proceeded by rail from Columbia to Camp Thomas, Georgia, and was assigned to duty with the 1st Army Corps, and remained in camp until July 28th, when it proceeded by rail to Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, and was there assigned to the 7th Army Corps, under General Lee. Removed to Columbia, South Carolina, by rail, September 24th, 1898, and furloughed for thirty days from September 29th, 1898. At the expiration of said furlough the company was mustered out of service, November 10th, 1898, by Captain E.B. Fuller, 7th Cavalry.

Company I, "Richland Volunteers" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

 The “Richland Volunteers” were organized at Columbia, South Carolina, and marched to Camp Ellerbe, May 3rd, 1898; was mustered into service May 20th, 1898, and remained in camp until June 6th, 1898, when it proceeded by rail to Chickamauga Park, Georgia, where it was assigned to the 1st Army Corps. Moved by rail, July 28th, 1898, from Rossville, Georgia, to Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, where it was assigned to the 7th Army Corps. Left Camp Cuba Libre for rendezvous at Columbia, South Carolina, September 24th, 1898, where it was furloughed for thirty days from September 29th, 1898, except guards and officers, who were on waiting orders. At the expiration of furlough the company was mustered out of service by Ezra B. Fuller, Captain, 7th Cavalry, chief mustering officer.

Company K, "Governors Guards"  (Click Here for a Company Roster):

The “Governor’s Guards” were organized at Columbia, South Carolina, and mustered into service May 24th, 1898, at Camp Ellerbee, by Ezra B. Fuller, Captain, 7th Cavalry. Left Camp Ellerbe June 6th, 1898, for Chickamauga Park, Georgia, with regiment. Remained in camp until July 28th, 1898, when it was ordered to 7th Army Corps, under General Lee. Remained at Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, until September 24th, 1898, and was then ordered to Columbia, South Carolina, for muster out. After reaching Columbia by rail, September 25th, was furloughed for thirty days from September 29th, except guard and officers, who were on waiting orders. At the expiration of furlough the company was mustered out of service by Captain Ezra B. Fuller, chief mustering officer, November 10th, 1898.

Company L, "Palmetto Rifles" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

The “Palmetto Rifles” were organized at Columbia, South Carolina, by consolidating two militia companies from Aiken and Bamberg into one company, and on 25th May, 1898, was mustered into service at Columbia, South Carolina, and remained in camp until June 6th, 1898, when it proceeded by rail to Camp Thomas, Georgia, where it remained in camp until July 29th, 1898, when it was ordered to Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, and arrived there July 30th, 1898.. On the 2nd day of August, a telegram from the War Department announced the muster out of the 1st S.C.V.I. This company proceeded by rail from thence to Columbia, the place of rendezvous, September 24th, 1898. When the company reached Columbia it was furloughed for thirty days from September 29th, 1898, except a guard and the officers, who were on waiting orders. At the expiration of the furlough, the company was mustered out of service on November 10th, 1898, by Ezra B. Fuller, Captain, 7th Cavalry, chief mustering officer, at Columbia, South Carolina.

Company M, "Sumter Light Infantry" (Click Here for a Company Roster):

The “Sumter Light Infantry” were organized at Sumter, South Carolina, on May 5th, 1898, and mustered into service at Columbia, South Carolina, on May 19th, 1898. Left Columbia, South Carolina, for Camp Thomas, Georgia, on June 6th, 1898; Left Camp Thomas for Camp Cuba Libre, Florida, July 29th, 1898; Left Florida for Columbia, South Carolina, by rail, on September 24th, 1898; was furloughed for thirty days from September 29th, 1898, except guard and officers, who were on waiting orders. At the expiration of furlough was mustered out of service on the 10th day of November, 1898, by Captain Ezra B. Fuller, 7th Cavalry, chief mustering officer.



Bibliography:

Floyd, Joseph W. Historical Roster and Itinerary of South Carolina Volunteer Troops who served in the late war between the United States and Spain, 1898, coupled with Brief Sketches of their movements from the Beginning to the Ending of the Conflict. (Columbia, S.C., The R. L. Bryan Company, 1901).

Neely, F. Tennyson, Neely's Panorama of Our New Possessions. (New York: December, 1898)(image source).

Statistical Exhibit of Strength of Volunteer Forces Called into Service During the War with Spain; with Losses from All Causes. (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1899).


Support this Site by Visiting the Website Store! (help us defray costs!)
We are providing the following service for our readers. If you are interested in books, videos, CD's etc. related to the Spanish American War, simply type in "Spanish American War" (or whatever you are interested in) as the keyword and click on "go" to get a list of titles available through Amazon.com.

Search:
Keywords: 
In Association with Amazon.com

Visit Main Page for copyright data

 
Return to Unit Profiles

Return to Main Page