The U. S. Revenue Cutter Service

in the

Spanish American War

By Robert Pendleton and Patrick McSherry

The seal of the United States Revenue Cutter Service
1790 - 1915

Click here to read the biography of 3rd Lt. (later Captain) Charles Satterlee
Ship Info.

ALEXANDER HAMILTON ||| ALGONQUIN ||| BOUTWELL ||| CALUMET ||| CHIPPEWA ||| COMMODORE PERRY
CORWIN ||| DEXTER |||GALVESTON ||| GRESHAM ||| HUDSON ||| HUGH McCULLOCH ||| JAMES GUTHRIE
LEVI WOODBURY ||| LOUIS McLANE ||| MANNING ||| MORRILL ||| ONONDAGA ||| RICHARD RUSH
ULYSSES S. GRANT ||| WILLIAM WINDOM ||| WINONA


General:

The U.S. Revenue Cutter Service, fore-runner of the modern U.S. Coast Guard, saw action during the Spanish American War. The vessels served "In cooperation" with  the U.S. Navy during the conflict.

History of the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service:

At the conclusion of the Revolutionary War the first Secretary of the Treasury of the newly formed United States of America, Alexander Hamilton, was immediately tasked to put in order the finances of the new Republic.

This was not an easy undertaking, the government was struggling financially and also trying to come to grips with the ongoing maritime smuggling of goods into the country, which had been considered a patriotic duty prior to and during the Revolutionary War with the English, but was now considered detrimental to her very survival.

Hamilton quickly realized that collecting tariffs on imported goods would be the means for generating the critical revenue that the country’s treasury so desperately needed. At the same time, he also realized the smugglers would resist and actively attempt to circumvent the government’s collection efforts.

He proposed the construction of 10 manned and armed cutters to collect and safeguard the revenue. From the beginning, Secretary Hamilton insisted that the officers of the new service were to be appointed, commissioned , and provided with military naval ranking.

On the 4th of August 1790, Congress authorized the purchase of the cutters along with the formation of a "Revenue Marine". Between 1790 and and 1798 the Revenue Marine's Revenue Cutter Service would be the only armed maritime service deployed by the United States. Vessels of the Revenue Marine were designated "United States Revenue Cutter" (U.S.R.C). By an Act of Congress on 31 July 1894, the Revenue Marine was officially designated the "Revenue Cutter Service" and her vessels continued to be designated U.S.R.C

During the Quasi-War with France in 1798-1801 the United States Navy was founded and the Revenue Cutter Service would fight alongside the Navy capturing, or helping to capture, 20 French ships (ten of those would be captured by RCS Pickering). This was the precedent that would temporarily transfer the Revenue Cutter Service to the Secretary of the Navy and her cutters to serve under the command of the United States Navy in time of war.

On July 31, 1876 Congress established the first School of Instruction to train officers for the Revenue Cutter Service at New Bedford, Massachusetts. In May of 1877, the first nine cadets arrived to begin their two-year program of instruction. In 1914 the academy’s name was changed to Revenue Cutter School of Instruction and in 1915, the school would be renamed United States Coast Guard Academy. In 1932, the academy was relocated to New London, Connecticut.

For 177 years the Revenue Cutter Service (later renamed Coast Guard) would operate under the authority of the United States Department of the Treasury.

The Revenue Cutter Service in the Spanish-American War of 1898:

 After the United States declared war with Spain on 21 April 1898, President McKinley directed the temporary transfer of the Revenue Cutter Service  to the direction of the Secretary of the Navy and directed that all RCS cutters cooperate with the U.S. Navy as part of the Auxiliary Naval force (note that in data below "date of transfer" refers to the date the vessel was placed under the direction of Secretary of the Navy). The Auxiliary Naval Force was made up of vessels and personnel from the various states’ naval militias, the U.S. Light House Service, U.S. Fish Commission, etc.

The Revenue Cutter service had 13 of its cutters (mounting 61 guns and aggregating 98 officers and 562 enlisted men) working in cooperation with the U.S. navy. Eight of the vessels served with the North Atlantic Squadron (43 guns, 58 officers, 339 enlisted men). One vessel, the HUGH McCULLOCH (6 guns; 10 officers, 95 enlisted men) served in Admiral Dewey's Asiatic Squadron.  Four vessels - apparently the CORWIN, GRANT, PERRY and RUSH  - patrolled the U.S. west coast from San Francisco to Alaska "in order to protect the treasure-laden vessels from the Klondike gold fields." These vessels mounted 12 guns, 30 officers, and 128 enlisted men.

The most well-known actions involving the vessels of the Revenue Cutter Service are the actions of the HUGH McCULLOCH and the HUDSON.

On 17 April 1898 the RCS HUGH McCULLOCH, commanded by Captain Daniel B. Hodgson, U.S.R.C.S., lightly armed and on a round-the-world shakedown cruise, joined the ships of the Asiatic Station at Hong Kong and was placed under the command of Admiral George Dewey.

HUGH McCULLOCH’s first notable act was less that conspicuous. As Asiatic Squadron attempted to enter Manila Bay unobserved, flames momentarily issued from the HUGH McCULLOCH’s funnel betraying the blacked-out. squadron, though it was probably already spotted.

On 1 May 1898, she would participate in the Battle of Manila Bay, Philippines, guarding the supply vessels ZAFIRO and NANSHAN. The HUGH McCULLOCH also carried the first reports of the battle to Hong Kong for communication with the outside world, and carried Filipino leader (and eventual U.S. adversary) Aguinaldo to the Philippines. Also, significantly, when conditions deteriorated between the U.S. and German naval forces following the Battle of Manila Bay, the HUGH McCULLOCH fired a shot across the bow of the German warship CORMORAN when she broke the U.S. blockade of Manila. The HUGH McCULLOCH also captured the Spanish gunboat LEYTE.

On the 21st of April the U.S. Navy blockade of Cuba began with eight RCS cutters assigned to Admiral Sampson’s fleet. On May 11, 1898 at the Battle of Cardenas, RCS HUDSON, commanded by Lieutenant Frank Hamilton Newcomb, USRCS, would successfully rescue the disabled Navy torpedo boat U.S.S. WINSLOW while both were under a galling Spanish fire.

Following the conflict, it was stated that:

“The Revenue-Cutter Service, through the efforts of it present efficient head, is to-day prepared to act as an auxiliary to the Navy in any scheme of defense. Its vessels are armed and its officers and men organized, instructed and drilled very much as in the naval service. In future wars, this Service will perform its proper duties – those of a coast-guard navy – and be supplemented by an auxiliary coast defense fleet.”

Post-War service:

On January 28, 1915, President Woodrow Wilson signed into law the Act to Create the Coast Guard. As a result of the Act the United States Revenue Service and Lifesaving Service were consolidated to form the United States Coast Guard. On April 1, 1967 the United States Coast Guard was transferred to the Department of Transportation.

As a result of Islamic extremist terrorist attacks on our nation on September 11, 2001, the President signed into law the Homeland Security Act of
2002 which created the new Department of Homeland Security. Under the legislation, the United States Coast Guard was transferred from the Department of Transportation to the new Department on March 1, 2003.


United States Revenue Service vessels that served in the Spanish-American War:

ALEXANDER HAMILTON (a.k.a. HAMILTON)
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
David Bell
Buffalo, New York
?
250 tons
?
38 Crewmen
1870-1871

The HAMILTON, commissioned in October, 1871, was an iron-hulled vessel, carried one 4 inch gun. She served with the North Atlantic Squadron. On August 10, 1898, she departed Key West, Florida, bound for the blockade off Havana, joining the fleet the following day where she delivered mail, and took up station with the blockading force. The following day she came under enemy fire but, rather than return the desultory shots, she hauled off out of range. With the armistice agreement on August 13 she completed her brief tour on blockade and headed, via Key West, to Charleston, South Carolina, where she arrived on  August 17 ending her co-operative service with the U.S. Navy.

List of officers of the ALEXANDER HAMILTON during the Spanish American War:

Captain W. D. Roath, commanding
 First Lieutenant. C. C. Fengar, executive
 Second Lieutenant William Van Edmondson Jacobs, navigator
 Second Lieutenant James Guy Ballinger
 Third Lieutenant O. G. Haines
 Chief Engineer James A. Severns
 First Assistant Engineer Harry L. Boyd
 Second Assistant Engineer J. D. Newton
 Surgeon Charles H. James, Jr.


ALGONQUIN
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Glove Iron Works,
Cleveland, Ohio
March 28, 1898
205 ft. 6 in. 
32 ft.
13 ft 2 in. 
1,181 tons
16
71 crewmen
1897

The ALGONQUIN  served with the North Atlantic Squadron and mounted two guns in her main battery. On August 17, 1898, she left service with the U.S. Navy.

Crew Roster:

Officers:

First Lieutenant W. C. DeHart, commanding
Second Lieutenant George C. Carmine
Second Lieutenant Frederick J. Hakke
Chief Engineer John R. Dally
First Assistant Engineer H. L. Taylor
Second Assistant Engineer R.F. Halpin

Enlisted Crew Members:

Andersen, F. G., Cabin Steward
Balaze, James, Ordinary Seaman
Barrett, Richard, Fireman
Burbank, F. H., Gunner
Cassidy, Thomas, Coxswain
Comstock, A. L. Master Coxswain
Croft, Earl, Seaman
Crosby, W. C., Cook
Desnoyer, Peter, Boy, Second Class
Eaton, C. E., Ordinary Seaman
Fields Charles, Boatswain
Fish, Charles, Oiler
Fish, S. W., Oiler
Gedeon, James, Coxswain
Jahan, W. C., Oiler
Kern, W.F., Carpenter
Klipfel, C. S., Master-at Arms
Marble, G. H., Boy, Second Class
McCrae, James, Boy, First Class
McHugh, Charles, Fireman
Moore, George, Coal Passer
Moore, M. W., Coal Passer
Mohr, Frank, Fireman
Murray, J. A., Ordinary Seaman
Olsen, Olaf, Machinist
O’Sears, J. H., Oiler
Quinton H. H., Boy, First Class
Recour, C. A., Ordinary Seaman
Renfert, J. F., Ordinary Seaman
Rice, H.S., Master Coxswain
Schmidt, J., Seaman
Scott, J. M., Ward Room Steward
Stewart, John, Fireman



BOUTWELL
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
?
?
?
?
?
?

The BOUTWELL was assigned to the Port of New Bern, North Carolina



CALUMET
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
?
June 26, 1898
174 tons
?
?
?

The CALUMET  served with the North Atlantic Squadron and mounted two guns in her main battery. The vessel was commanded by 1st Lt. W. H. Cushing, U.S.R.C.S. The vessel served with the Navy from June 26, 1898 until August 27, 1898.

List of officers of the CALUMET during the Spanish American War:

First Lieutenant W. H. Cushing, commanding
 Third Lieutenant W. G. Blasdell, executive
 First Assistant Engineer A. J. Howison
 Second Assistant Engineer Urban Harvey


CHIPPEWA
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
?
?
?
?
?
?

The CHIPPEWA was assigned to the Stayed in the Great Lakes during the war.



COMMODORE PERRY (a.k.a. PERRY)
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Union Drydock Co.,
Buffalo, New York
April 24, 1898
165 ft 
?
?
?
?

The PERRY, commissioned in 1884, was an iron-hulled, single screw vessel, which was also provided with a brigantine rig.  She served with the Pacific Squadron protecting vessels travelling between San Francisco and the Klondike gold fields. The vessel was commanded by Capt. W. F. Kilgore, U.S.R.C.S. The PERRY served with the Navy from April 24, 1898 until August 24, 1898.

List of officers of the COMMODORE PERRY during the Spanish American War:

Captain W. F. Kilgore, commanding
 First Lieutenant James Henry Brown, executive
 Second Lieutenant H. L. Peckham, navigator
 Third Lieutenant R. M. Sturdevant
 Third Lieutenant F. B. Goudy
 Chief Engineer C. W. Monroe
 Second Assistant Engineer T.W. Ross
 Second Assistant Engineer W. J. Sedgwick
 Surgeon W. L. Ludlow



CORWIN
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
?
?
424 tons (estimated)
?
?
?

The CORWIN, a wooden-hulled vessel, served with the Pacific Squadron protecting vessels travelling between San Francisco and the Klondike gold fields.

List of officers of the CORWIN during the Spanish American War:

Captain W. J. Herring, commanding
 First Lieutenant P.W. Thompson, executive
 Second Lieutenant Preston Henry Uberroth, navigator
 Second Lieutenant Frederick Chamberlayne Billard
 Second Lieutenant Bernard Holt Camden
 First Assistant Engineer Charles F. Nash
 Second Assistant Engineer John I. Bryan
 Second Assistant Engineer Samuel M. Rock
 Surgeon Stephen Whyte



DEXTER
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
?
?
?
?
?
?

The DEXTER was assigned to the Port of Narraganset Bay, Massachusetts.



GALVESTON
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Reeder & Sons,
Baltimore, MD
None
185 ft 3 in. 
29 ft 
9 ft 3 in 
708 tons
12
58 crewmen
1891

The GALVESTON was not transferred to the Navy during the war, but was used to aid in the defense of New Orleans. In 1900, she was renamed APACHE.



GRESHAM
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Globe Iron Works Co.,
Cleveland, OH
March 24, 1898
205 ft. 6 in. 
32 ft. 
12 ft. 6 in.
1,090 tons
14.5 knots
103 crewmen
1896

The GRESHAM, commissioned on May 30, 1897, served with the North Atlantic Squadron. She was a steel-hulled singled screw vessel. She was altered for naval service, and after completion of the alterations, patrolled the northeast coast of the U.S. She ceased naval service on August 17, 1898. The vessel carrired four Driggs-Schroeder rapid-fire guns.



HUDSON
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
John H. Dialogue
Camden, New Jersey
March 24, 1898
94 ft 6 in 
20 ft 6 in 
10 ft 3 in 
174 tons
12 knots
23 Crewmen
?

The HUDSON, commissioned on August 17, 1893, was a steel-hulled, single-screw vessel, with an engine capable of generating 525 horsepower. She had three guns - two six-pounders and one Model 1895 Colt automatic machine gun - in her battery. The vessel, operating under the command of Lt. F. H. Newcombe, served with the North Atlantic Squadron, distinguishing herself on various occasions. Her most notable action was at Cardenas, where she towed the badly damaged torpedo boat WINSLOW out of range of Spanish guns during a hot battle. Click here to read more about this engagement. In addition, she captured two small fishing sloops attemptig to run the naval blockade of Cuba. Generally, she was used as a dispatch vessel.

List of officers of the HUDSON during the Spanish American War:

First Lieutenant Frank H. Newcomb, commanding
 Second Lieutenant J. F. Scott, executive
 Third Lieutenant E. E. Mead
 First Assistant Engineer N. E. Cutchin
 Second Assistant Engineer Theodore G. Lewton

List of enlisted crewmen present at the action at Cardenas:

Anderson, Gustaf, Quartermaster
Bednarick, Emrik, Coal Passer
Callaghan, John, Fireman *
Cavanagh, Hos, Seaman**
Hodson, Thomas, Coal Passer
Johnson, E. F., Cook ***
Jones, Moses W., Boy ***
Lawson, John, Seaman
Mountain, John F., Boatswain
Peterson, Gustaf, Quartermaster
Pidersen, Jak, Seaman
Platt, Joe, Coal Passer
Reilly, James, Oiler
Reilly, John M., Fireman
Sabery, Harry, Seaman
Savage, Henry, Steward**
Ward, R. S., Seaman
Williamsen, William, Fireman

*      Deserted June 30, 1898
**    Declared a deserter May 31, 1898
***  Person of Color



HUGH McCULLOCH (a.k.a. McCULLOCH)
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
William Cramp, 
Philadelphia
?
219 ft 
33 ft, 4 in. 
14 ft. 
1,280 tons
17.5 knots
68 officers and men
?

The McCULLOCH served with the Asiatic Squadron and was involved in the Battle of Manila Bay. For a full account of this vessel, click here. For a crew roster of the McCULLOCH, click here.



JAMES GUTHRIE (a.k.a. GUTHRIE)
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
H. A. Ramsey
Baltimore, MD
?
?
?
?
1881

The vessel was not actually transferred to the Navy during the war, but aided in guarding Baltimore from May 9 to July 20, 1898.



LEVI WOODBURY (a.k.a. WOODBURY)
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
J. W. Lynn and Sons
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
?
138 ft
26 ft 6 in
11 ft
370 tons
?
7 officers and 34 enlisted men
1863/1864

The vessel was a wooden-hulled, single screw ship, carrying seven guns in its main battery. The WOODBURY, originally built as the RMS (Revenue Marine Service) MAHONING,  was placed in commission on July 18, 1864. The vessel was renamed RMS LEVI WOODBURY on June 5, 1873.  During the Spanish American War, the vessel served with the North Atlantic Squadron and took part in the blockade of Havana. The vessel continued to serve with the USRCS until the U.S. Coast Guard was created on July 19, 1915, when she was placed out of commission at Portland, Oregon.

Roster of Officers of the WOODBURY during the Spanish American War:

Captain H. B. Rogers, commanding
First Lieutenant W. G. Ross, executive
Second Lieutenant Staley Marion Landry, navigator
Second Lieutenant Detlef Frederick Argentino de Otte
Third Lieutenant Charles Satterlee
Chief Engineer E. G. Schwartz
First Assistant Engineer E.J. Noonan
Second Assistant Engineer Robert E. Wright
Surgeon Edward F. McConnell

Andersen, Albin, 2nd Class Boy
Andersen, H., Fireman
Austin, T. J., Wardroom Steward *
Baker, Walter, 1st Class Boy *
Berg, Harold, Seaman
Beyer, George, Seaman
Carlsson, A.W., Seaman
Carter, W. J., Gunner
Cedertstrom. Rudolf , Coxswain
Chambers, E., Fireman
Christiansen,C.E., Seaman
Christiansen, Olief, Gunner’s Mate
Cooke, G. S., Seaman
Cugle, C.H., Ordinary Seaman
Cushing, W. S., Ordinary Seaman
Dixon, W., 1st Class Boy
Duress, Ed, Ordinary Seaman
Dyhrberg, H., Bugler
Flemming, M., Cabin Steward *
Groden, J. H., Ordinary Seaman
Hansen, H. E., Ordinary Seaman
Hopper, S. E., Seaman
Jansen, Gustav, Sr. Master
Johnson, John, Coal Passer
Johnson, John, Seaman
Johanson, Niles, Seaman
Jorgensen, J. C. , 2nd Oiler
LeGault, G. C., Coal Passer
Lindquist, Fred, Seaman
Madsen, Niels, 1st Class Boy
Mathisen, C. A., Carpenter
Montcastle, George, Seaman
Nielsen, John, Ordinary Seaman
Nordgren, Emil, Coxswain
Nostrand, Ludwig, Sr. Master
Petersen, Charles, 1st Oiler
Peel. John, Jr. Master**
Reinestsen, Julius, Ordinary Seaman
Rogers, A., Cook*
Rossiland, L. G., Coxswain
Sandison, Charles, Boatswain
Sellers, M., Fireman
Selvig, Kris, Seaman
Sewell, W. H., 2nd Class Boy *
Sherburne, Levi, Master at Arms
Stevens, E. H., 1st Class Boy
Tonneson, John, Senior Master
Woodside, H. F., 3d Oiler
Young, Morris, Coal Passer

*    Colored
**  Died 11 May 1898, United States Navy Hospital, Norfolk, Virginia



LOUIS McLANE (a.k.a. McLANE)
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Wilmington, Delaware
?
346 tons (estimated)
?
?
?

The McLANE was an iron-hulled vessel and served with the North Atlantic Squadron. The vessel had originally been constructed as the side-wheel steamship VIRGINIA DARE, but was purchased on by the U.S. Navy in October 1861 and commissioned as the U.S.S. DELAWARE. In August, 1865, she was sold to the Department of the Treasury, becoming the RMS (Revenue Marine Service) DELAWARE. She was renamed RMS LOUIS  McLANE on June 1873 and then USRC LOUIS McLANE on July 31, 1894.

List of officers of the LOUIS McLANE during the Spanish American War:

First Lieutenant William E. Reynolds, commanding
Second Lieutenant Andrew James Henderson, executive
Second Lieutenant A. R. Hasson
Third Lieutenant George W. Cairns
Second Assistant Engineer Charles A. Wheeler



MANNING
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Atlantic Works
East Boston,
Massachusetts
?
205 ft 
32 ft 
13 ft 9 in 
980 tons
15 knots
10 officers and 65 enlisted men
?

The MANNING, commissioned on January 8, 1898, was a composite-hulled, single-screw vessel, with an engine capable of generating 2,000 horsepower. She mounted three small-caliber guns. The MANNING served with the North Atlantic Squadron.

List of officers of the MANNING during the Spanish American War:

Captain F. M. Munger, commanding
First Lieutenant C. H. McLellan, executive
Second Lieutenant Godfrey L. Carden, ordinance officer
Second Lieutenant George M. Daniels, navigator
Third Lieutenant George H, Mann
Third Lieutenant Walter Aquila Willey
Third Lieutenant P. C. Prince
Chief Engineer H. C. Whitworth
First Assistant Engineer Harry U. Butler
Second Assistant Engineer Hermann Kotzschmar, Jr.
Second Assistant Engineer Daniel W. Blake
Surgeon A. T. Mitchell



MORRILL
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Pusey and Jones
Shipbuilding Co.,
Wilmington, Delaware
March 28, 1898
145 ft 3 in 
24 ft 
9 ft 6 in 
397 tons
?
?
1889

The MORRILL was an iron-hulled, single screw vessel. She mounted two three-pounder guns and served with the North Atlantic Squadron. The vessel was commanded by Capt. H. D. Smith, U.S.R.C.S. The MORRILL served with the Navy from March 28, 1898 to August 11, 1898.

List of officers of the MORRILL during the Spanish American War:

Captain H.D. Smith, commanding
 First Lieutenant John Cassin Cantwell, executive
 Second Lieutenant F.A. Levis, navigator
 Second Lieutenant C.S. Craig
 Third Lieutenant Henry G. Fisher
 Chief Engineer E.P. Webber
 First Assistant Engineer William Robinson
 Second Assistant Engineer F.G. Snyder
 Surgeon J. Spencer Hough



ONONDAGA
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Globe Iron Works
Cleveland, Ohio
March 28, 1898
205 ft 6 in 
32 ft 
13 ft 2 in 
1,190 tons
16 Knots
73 Crewmen
?



RICHARD RUSH (a.k.a. RUSH)
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Atlantic Works,
East Boston,
Massachusetts
?
?
?
40 Crewmen
?

Launched on March 14, 1873 and Commissioned on July 21, 1874, RUSH served with the Pacific Squadron protecting vessels travelling between San Francisco and the Klondike gold fields during the Spanish American War. The vessel carried three guns in her battery.

List of officers of the RICHARD RUSH during the Spanish American War:

Captain W. H. Roberts, commanding
 First Lieutenant James Louis Sill, executive
 Second Lieutenant Aaron Lichtenberg Gamble, navigator
 Third Lieutenant L. T. Cutter
 Third Lieutenant Eben Barker
 Chief Engineer David McC. French
 Second Assistant Engineer W. L. Maxwell
 Second Assistant Engineer Waller Taylor
 Surgeon Robert McAdory



ULYSSES S. GRANT (a.k.a. GRANT)
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Pusey & Jones Corp.
Wilmington, DE
April 11, 1898
407 tons
?
?
1870-1871

The GRANT, an iron-hulled, single-screwed vessel, served with the Pacific Squadron protecting vessels travelling between San Francisco and the Klondike gold fields. She ceased her naval service on August 15, 1898. She was sold by the Revenue Cutter Service in 1906.

List of officers of the ULYSSES S. GRANT during the Spanish American War:

Captain J. A. Slamm, commanding
 First Lieutenant Byron Laverne Reed, executive
 Second Lieutenant Benjamin Maurice Chiswell, navigator
 Third Lieutenant J. C. Hooker
 Third Lieutenant Eugene Blake, Jr.
 Chief Engineer A. L. Broadbent
 Second Assistant Engineer H.D. Glover
 Second Assistant Engineer John B. Turner
 Surgeon Robert R. Hammond



WILLIAM WINDOM (a.k.a. WINDOM)
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Iowa Iron Works,
Dubuque, Iowa
March 24, 1898
170 ft 8 in
27 ft 
8 ft 3 in 
525 tons
15 knots
?
?

The vessel was still incomplete when she was moved from her builder to Baltimore, Maryland and completed. Commissioned by USRCS on June 30, 1896, the WINDOM was a steel-hulled, single screw vessel, with an engine capable of generating 800 horsepower. She carried one small-caliber gun. The vessel served with the North Atlantic Squadron. The vessel was commanded by Capt. S. E. Maguire, U.S.R.C.S. The WINDOM served with the Navy from March 24, 1898 until August 11, 1898. This vessel was later renamed COMANCHE.

List of officers of the WILLIAM WINDOM during the Spanish American War:

Captain S. E. Maguire, commanding
 First Lieutenant F. G. F. Wadsworth, executive
 Second Lieutenant Richard Owens Crisp, navigator
 Second Lieutenant S. P. Edmunds
 Third Lieutenant J. V. Wild
 Chief Engineer C. F. Coffin
 First Assistant Engineer C. W. Zastrow
 Second Assistant Engineer Edwin W. Davis
 Surgeon John C. Travis (March 29 to August 1, 1898)
 Surgeon W. E. Handy (August 2 to August 29, 1898)


WINONA
 
Builder
Date of
Transfer
Length
Beam
Draft
Displacement
Speed
Complement
Constructed
Pusey and Jones
Shipbuilding Co.,
Wilmington, Delaware
?
149 ft 
321 tons
?
?
?

Commissioned by the USRCS in 1890, the WINONA patrolled the waters off Mobile, Alabama during the Spanish American War.


Bibliography:

Clerk of Joint Committee on Printing, The Abridgement of Message from the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress. (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1899). Vol. 2., 981, 1013, 1090, 1091, 1106, 1109, 1222-1223, 1230.

Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Vol. III (Washington: Navy Department, 1977) 135, 157, 385.

McSherry, Patrick, "Revenue Cutter McCulloch," The Spanish American War Centennial Website, http://www.spanamwar.com/mccullch.htm

Mooney, James L., ed., Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Vol. 1, Part A (Washington: Naval Historical Center, 1991) 183, 328.

Muster Roll for the month of May 1898, Key West, Florida Signed by Captain Newcomb, 4 June 1898 at Key West, Florida, NARA, Muster Rolls of U.S. Revenue Cutter Service, RG 26, Entry 188 (NC-31), Box 70, Hudson, 1893-1906 [HUDSON enlisted personnel at Cardenas]

Muster Roll for the month of June 1898, Signed by First  Lieutenant W.C. DeHart, commanding. NARA Muster Rolls of U.S. Revenue Cutter Service
RG 26, Entry 188 (NC-31) Box 6, Algonquin, 1898 – 1903 (Roster of the ALGONQUIN).

Naming of the Revenue Cutter Service, by Act of July 31, 1894 (28 Sta. 171), United States Congress.

O’Byrne, Jr., F.X., Lieutenant Commander, United States Coast Guard, The United States Coast Guard, 1993.
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/report/1933/OFX.htm

Secretary of the Treasury, "The United States Revenue Cutter Service in the War with Spain, 1898," Office of The Secretary, Division of Revenue Cutter Service, (Washington, D.C.,: Treasury Department, September 1, 1899).

Tariff Act of August 4, 1790 (1 Stat. 175), United States First Congress.

U.S. Coast Guard. Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Revenue Cutters: A Historic Image Gallery,
http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-cp/history/USRC_Photo_Index.html

U.S.Coast Guard. A Bill S.2337. In the Senate of the United States, May 26, 1913. To create the Coast Guard by combining therein the existing Life-Saving Service and Revenue Cutter Service (38 Stat. 800) 28 January 1915.
http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-cp/history/uscgbill.html


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